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dc.contributor.authorCarney, J.A.
dc.contributor.authorElias, M.
dc.coverage.spatialWest Africa
dc.coverage.temporal2001 - 2004
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T20:07:55Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T20:07:55Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier4707
dc.identifier.citationCanadian Journal of African Studies 40(2): 235-267
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/68944
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractThis article discusses how local gendered knowledge and practices in the shea agroforestry production in West Africa shape landscapes over time and space. Using political ecology, the article also discusses how shea nut production has been influenced and controlled by regional and global markets throughout pre-colonial, colonial, and contemporary histories. Using fieldwork studies in West Africa from 2001 to 2004, these authors specifically explore local indigenous knowledge, and the role of women's knowledge, conservation, and control over shea butter and oil production. In shea agroforestry, women cultivate and conserve the trees through seed selection, fire, processing, and protection. Emphasis is centered on the need to recognize local men and women's knowledge of the butter tree and the landscape for sustainable resource management and development.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherCanadian Association of African Studies
dc.relation.urihttp://www.jstor.org/stable/25433880
dc.rightsCopyright 2006 Canadian Association of African Studies and JSTOR
dc.subjectCommodity crops
dc.subjectAgrobiodiversity
dc.subjectFamily
dc.subjectConservation
dc.subjectEconomic impacts
dc.subjectTraditional farming
dc.subjectTree crops
dc.subjectEthnicity/race
dc.subjectEnvironmental impacts
dc.subjectEmpowerment
dc.subjectCommunity development
dc.subjectFire
dc.subjectWomen
dc.subjectIndigenous community
dc.subjectGovernment policy
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectAgroforestry
dc.subjectLocal knowledge
dc.subjectGovernment
dc.subjectMen
dc.subjectForests
dc.subjectAgricultural ecosystems
dc.subjectIndigenous knowledge
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectAgroforestry
dc.subjectAfrica
dc.subjectMali
dc.subjectGuinea
dc.subjectFarming
dc.subjectLocal knowledge
dc.subjectFire
dc.subjectConservation
dc.subjectColonialization
dc.subjectGlobal markets
dc.subjectTrees
dc.subjectFarm/Enterprise Scale Field Scale Governance
dc.titleRevealing gendered landscapes: Female knowledge and agroforestry of African shea
dc.typeAbstract
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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