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dc.contributor.authorUN News Centre
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T20:07:55Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T20:07:55Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier4708
dc.identifier.citation6/22/2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/68945
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractWith population increasing to an expected nine billion by 2050, the issue of food security is at the forefront of international discussions. At the UN meeting in Brussels in June 2010, experts discussed opportunities to increase food production for the growing population. Dr. Olivier De Schutter, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food, stressed the importance of using less conventional methods and focusing on sustainable methods, such as agroecological farming, which involves the intercropping of trees in agricultural fields. Agroecology approaches around the world have resulted in huge increases in crop yields and farmer income, while maintaining the environmental quality of the soil. This article contends that making this change to more sustainable agricultural methods could significantly help address the problem of food insecurity and climate change.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherUN News Service
dc.relation.urihttp://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=35105&Cr=food+production&Cr1
dc.subjectFood strategy
dc.subjectSoil management
dc.subjectSoil quality
dc.subjectFood security
dc.subjectPest management
dc.subjectAgroforestry
dc.subjectAgroecological farming
dc.subjectUnited Nations
dc.subjectPopulation growth
dc.subjectRight to food
dc.subjectOlivier de schutter
dc.subjectIncreased crop yield
dc.subjectLand rehabilitation
dc.subjectTanzania
dc.subjectMalawi
dc.subjectField Scale Governance
dc.titleBoost agroecological farming to feed world and save climate, UN expert says
dc.typeAbstract
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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