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dc.contributor.authorSinn, R.en
dc.contributor.authorKetzis, J.en
dc.contributor.authorChen, T.en
dc.coverage.spatialHondurasen
dc.coverage.spatialBoliviaen
dc.coverage.spatialPerúen
dc.coverage.spatialChinaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T20:07:57Zen
dc.date.available2016-04-19T20:07:57Zen
dc.date.issued1998en
dc.identifier4718en
dc.identifier.citationSmall Ruminant Research 34(3): 259-269en
dc.identifier.issn0921-4488en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/68954en
dc.descriptionMetadata only recorden
dc.description.abstractIn this paper the authors examine the role of women in the field of sheep and goat production by highlighting five different studies of goat projects located in developing countries. Goats and sheep were chosen for this study because of the nature of their grazing since they are able to feed off limited resources, they coexist well with other livestock due to little direct food competition and because they are smaller and need less food than larger livestock. Also, early sexual maturity and short gestation terms creates abbreviated generation intervals. This generates an immediate source of cash and allows goats and sheep to be swiftly re-stocked. Almost everyone in the family can raise them and there are few cultural and religious restrictions on the consumption of goats and sheep. Finally, because goats and sheep are less prestigious to raise than cattle and other large livestock, men are less likely to interfere with female authority in their production. Looking at studies in Lake Yojoa, Honduras, Tontolo, Honduras, San Jose Llanga, Bolivia, Mantaro Valley, Peru, and Hebei Province, China, the authors concluded that goats and sheep are an important instrument for women to have their own income and contribute to the food security of their families. They suggest that goat and sheep enterprises have become a focal point for development programs.en
dc.format.mimetypetext/plainen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevier Science B.V.en
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectRural developmenten
dc.subjectWomenen
dc.subjectMalnutritionen
dc.subjectFood securityen
dc.subjectGenderen
dc.subjectPovertyen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectFarmersen
dc.subjectGender relationsen
dc.subjectHungeren
dc.subjectLivestock farmingen
dc.subjectProductivityen
dc.subjectResource allocationen
dc.subjectRural womenen
dc.subjectUnderdeveloped countriesen
dc.subjectFarm/Enterprise Scaleen
dc.titleThe role of women in the sheep and goat sectoren
dc.typeAbstracten
dc.rights.holderCopyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.en
dc.contributor.departmentSustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Knowledgebaseen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/S0921-4488(99)00078-4en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten


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