Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorUniversity of Tennessee. Institute of Agriculture
dc.coverage.spatialTennessee
dc.coverage.spatialDust Bown
dc.coverage.spatialKansas
dc.coverage.spatialTexas
dc.coverage.spatialOklahoma
dc.coverage.spatialColorado
dc.coverage.spatialNew Mexico
dc.coverage.temporal1990 - 2004
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T20:08:19Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T20:08:19Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier4819
dc.identifier.other4819_No_till.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/69051
dc.description.abstractThis presentation emphasizes the need for no-till crop farming in areas such as the Dust Bowl, which includes New Mexico, Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, and Colorado, because of the problems associated with soil disruption. No-till systems are increasingly being adopted because of the benefits to soil fertility, pest management, weed management, and reduction of loose top soil and erosion. This presentation includes statistics of the no-till adoption rates from 1994-2004 in the U.S. and in 2001 for all continents.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherKnoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture
dc.subjectConservation agriculture
dc.subjectSoil erosion
dc.subjectSoil management
dc.subjectSoil fertility
dc.subjectConservation strategy
dc.subjectConservation tillage
dc.subjectTennessee
dc.subjectStrip cropping
dc.subjectDust bowl
dc.subjectNo-till
dc.subjectContour plowing
dc.subjectTerraces
dc.subjectFarm/Enterprise Scale Field Scale
dc.titleConservation agriculture: To till or not to till?
dc.typePresentation
dc.type.dcmitypeText


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record