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dc.contributor.authorShah, M.K.
dc.coverage.spatialDarko
dc.coverage.spatialGhana
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-19T20:29:54Z
dc.date.available2016-04-19T20:29:54Z
dc.date.issued1998
dc.identifier5010
dc.identifier.isbn1-85339-421-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/70065
dc.descriptionMetadata only record
dc.description.abstractThis chapter discusses the use of Participatory Rural Appraisal to obtain gendered perceptions or differences of well-being and poverty, gendered impacts of poverty, and opportunities for social or economic change in Darko, Ghana. Findings show that men and women define well-being and poverty differently based on material wealth, marital status, religion, land mass, crops, and money. Also, social change is occurring in Darko because household composition is changing. This is due in some ways to poverty, disproving the assumption that household income and livelihood is pooled and shared in equal fashion. The author concludes that using participatory methodologies allows for the differences between women and men to be recognized and thus could be useful in creating more effective and targeted strategies of development programs.
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherITGD Publishing
dc.relation.ispartofIn: Guijt, I. and M.K. Shah (eds.). The Myth of Community, 131-140
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectEmpowerment
dc.subjectCommunity participation
dc.subjectAfrica
dc.subjectSocial change
dc.subjectWell-being
dc.subjectWatershed
dc.titleThe Myth of Community: Gender Issues in Participatory Development
dc.typeAbstract
dc.type.dcmitypeText


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