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dc.contributor.authorEnsor, Breanne Leighen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-24T08:00:46Z
dc.date.available2016-06-24T08:00:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-23en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:7359en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/71424
dc.description.abstractIncreased floodplain and wetland restoration activity has raised concerns about potential impacts on the release of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere due to restored connectivity between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Research has shown GHG fluxes from hydrologically active landscapes such as floodplains and wetlands vary spatially and temporally in response to primary controls including soil moisture, soil temperature, and available nutrients. In this study, we performed a semimonthly sampling campaign measuring GHG (CO2, CH4, and N2O) fluxes from six locations within a third-order stream floodplain. Site locations were based on dominant landscape positions and hydrologic activity along a topographic gradient including a constructed inset floodplain at the stream margin, the natural levee, an active slough, the general vegetated floodplain, a convergence zone fed by groundwater, and the upland area. Flux measurements were compared to abiotic controls on GHG production to determine the most significant factors affecting GHG flux from the floodplain. We found correlations between CO2 flux and soil temperature, organic matter content, and soil moisture, CH4 flux and pH, bulk density, inundation period length, soil temperature, and organic matter content. But minimal correlations between N2O flux and the measured variables. Spatially, our results demonstrate that constructed inset floodplains have higher global warming potential in the form of CH4 than any other site and for all other GHGs, potentially offsetting the positive benefits incurred by enhanced connectivity. However, at the reach scale, total CO2 flux from the soil remains the greater influence on climate since the area covered by these inset floodplains is comparatively much smaller than the rest of the floodplain.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectfloodplainen_US
dc.subjectgreenhouse gasen_US
dc.subjectCO2en_US
dc.subjectCH4en_US
dc.subjectN2Oen_US
dc.subjectinset floodplainen_US
dc.subjectrestorationen_US
dc.subjectsoil moistureen_US
dc.subjectinundationen_US
dc.subjectsoil temperatureen_US
dc.subjectsoil nutrientsen_US
dc.titleSpatial and Temporal Trends in Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from a Temperate Floodplain along a Stream-Riparian-Upland Gradienten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiological Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairScott, Durelle T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHester, Erich T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHession, W. Cullyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrahm, Brian D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThomas, R. Quinnen_US


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