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dc.contributor.authorBauman, Michael Justinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-26T08:00:58Z
dc.date.available2016-06-26T08:00:58Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-25en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:8372en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/71467
dc.description.abstractAs energy prices and demand are projected to increase globally and markets become more competitive nationally and internationally; the wood products industry must find ways to remain relevant. By: 1) analyzing energy-saving recommendations contained in the IAC database; 2) comparing those recommendations by criteria such as cost, savings, and payback period; 3) identifying recommendations that incorporate lean manufacturing principles; and 4) investigating the practices and perceptions of manufacturers at the facility level, this project provides information for identifying the greatest opportunities for energy management among U.S. wood product manufacturers. Results from the analysis of the IAC database show that wood product manufacturers had a low implementation rate of energy recommendations ranked purely by cost, savings, and payback period among wood product manufacturers suggesting they were not focused on implementing energy recommendations specifically based on those criteria. While some recommendations were found to be statistically different in at least one criteria: cost, savings, or payback period between wood and non-wood manufactures as well as primary and secondary wood manufacturers, only two recommendations had practical differences, large payback periods, between primary and secondary wood manufacturers. Twenty-four of 192 energy recommendations were classified as lean-based energy recommendations using the Kirby and Green (2003) methodology, however, there was no clear evidence to suggest the lean-based energy recommendations were superior in terms of cost, savings, or payback period when compared to simple energy recommendations. Interviews with primary and secondary manufacturers revealed a lack of commitment to energy performance improvement and the reported barriers of implementation among a small sample of wood products manufacturers suggests that the dissemination of energy management knowledge and benefits is a problem.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectEnergy Managementen_US
dc.subjectIndustrial Assessment Centersen_US
dc.subjectWood Product Manufacturingen_US
dc.subjectFurnitureen_US
dc.subjectLean Managementen_US
dc.subjectLean Manufacturingen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of Energy Recommendations in the U.S. Wood Products Industryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForest Resources and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.description.degreeMSen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForest Productsen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBond, Brian Hen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberQuesada Pineda, Henry Joseen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWiedenbeck, Janice Kathrynen_US


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