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dc.contributor.authorWilk, Ayla Arselen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-29T08:00:34Z
dc.date.available2016-06-29T08:00:34Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-28en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:7935en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/71651
dc.description.abstractTo address 21st century environmental and economic issues, the practice of agricultural science has become more interdisciplinary, collaborative, and reliant on wider community connections. These changes have fueled demands to improve public agricultural literacy and strengthen the agricultural science workforce, increasing expectations for high-quality undergraduate teaching and public scholarship by agricultural science faculty. Unfortunately, faculty often lack professional preparation for this aspect of their work (Bagdonis and Dodd, 2010; Blickenstaff, Wolf, Falk, and Foltz, 2015). In other STEM fields, K-12 outreach by graduate students has gained popularity as a way to improve scientists' skills and outlook toward public scholarship. This thesis explored learning and professional identity development for participants in a K-12 outreach program for graduate students in the College of Agricultural Sciences at Virginia Tech. The theoretical framework of Kolb's (1984) experiential learning cycle and Lave and Wenger's (1991) situated learning theory were employed to explore these processes. Findings revealed that the Graduate Extension Scholars saw themselves as educators and public scholars both before and after participating in the program. Motivations for participation were related to identified gaps in their professional preparation. Participants believed that their knowledge, skill, and professional identity around teaching and public scholarship had been strengthened by their participation in the program. The program's constructivist experiential theoretical framework, community of practice, and extensive support structures were identified by participants as contributors to these outcomes. This study informs program evaluation and has broader implications for preparing future agricultural science faculty.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural Educationen_US
dc.subjectScience and Educationen_US
dc.subjectHigher Educationen_US
dc.titleExperiential Learning and Professional Identity Development for Scientists Participating in K-12 Outreach: A Case Study of the Graduate Extension Scholars Programen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAgricultural and Extension Educationen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Extension Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSpindler, Matthew Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberScherer, Hannah H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGlasson, George E.en_US


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