Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCantor, Jacob Rothbergen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-09T08:00:12Z
dc.date.available2016-07-09T08:00:12Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-08en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:8557en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/71762
dc.description.abstractPoor sanitation infrastructure in rural areas can often lead to high levels of fecal contamination in local waterbodies and subsequent exposure to waterborne disease can occur. Although standard water quality measures such as quantification of E. coli can reveal relative concentrations of fecal contamination, they do not pinpoint the sources of such contamination. Source assessment in rural areas affected by untreated household waste might be improved with the human-specific, microbial source tracking marker HF183. This study attempted to quantify HF183 in two particular Appalachia streams with known discharges of untreated household waste. Water samples were taken above and at multiple points below these discharges on 29 occasions between August 2012 and April 2016, and tested for both HF183 and E. coli. HF183 was detected consistently in one of the study streams, though the concentrations were generally much lower than those previously reported in raw sewage; in the other watershed, HF183 was never detected. Further analysis via a multiple linear regression model showed a positive correlation between the level of E. coli and the proximity and number of known waste discharge points upstream from each sampling site. Primary conclusions of this study include: 1) HF183 is not always detected, even in watersheds with known sources of human fecal contamination, 2) it may be a useful water quality assessment tool where such contamination is suspected, particularly in cases where contaminant source allocation is necessary for setting mitigation priorities.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectSource trackingen_US
dc.subjectfecal contaminationen_US
dc.subjectE. colien_US
dc.subjectBacHF183en_US
dc.subjectsanitationen_US
dc.subjectAppalachiaen_US
dc.titleA multi-disciplinary approach to tracking the downstream impacts of inadequate sanitation in Central Appalachiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBiological Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological Systems Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKrometis, Leigh Anne Henryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSarver, Emily Allynen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBadgley, Brian Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKline, Karen S.en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record