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dc.contributor.authorVanhaitsma, Amanda Joyen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-13T08:00:13Z
dc.date.available2016-08-13T08:00:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-08-12en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:8281en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/72245
dc.description.abstractAlthough many efforts and strategies have been implemented to reduce over-pumping of aquifer-systems, land subsidence is still a serious issue worldwide. Accurate aquifer characterization is critical to understand the response of an aquifer-system to prolonged pumping but is often difficult and expensive to conduct. The purpose of this thesis is to determine the validity of estimating aquifer-system parameters from a single cumulative compaction record and corresponding nested water-level data deconvolved into temporal components. Over a decade of compaction and water-level data were collected from an extensometer and multi-level piezometer at the Lorenzi site in Las Vegas Valley and when graphed yearly, seasonal, and daily signals are observed. Each temporal signal reflects different characteristics of the aquifer-system, including the distinction between aquifer and aquitard parameters, as the three temporal stresses influence the compaction record uniquely. Maximum cross-correlation was used to determine the hydrodynamic lag between changing water-levels and subsidence within the seasonal signal while principal components analysis was used to statistically verify the presence of the three temporal signals. Assumptions had to be made but nearly all estimated Lorenzi site aquifer-system parameters fell either within the reasonable range or were similar in magnitude to parameter values estimated in previous studies. Unfortunately, principal components analysis was unable to detect the three temporal signals. A cumulative compaction record may be difficult to obtain but analyzing the precision measurements of an extensometer results in precise aquifer-system parameters and as the precision of aquifer-system parameters increase so does the ability to sustainably manage groundwater.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectaquifer-system parametersen_US
dc.subjectcompactionen_US
dc.subjectLorenzi siteen_US
dc.subjectLas Vegasen_US
dc.subjectsubsidenceen_US
dc.titleMethods for Evaluating Aquifer-System Parameters from a Cumulative Compaction Recorden_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGeosciencesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairBurbey, Thomas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchreiber, Madeline E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDu, Pangen_US


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