Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorShayo, Ashaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-04T08:00:30Z
dc.date.available2016-10-04T08:00:30Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-03en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:8737en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73160
dc.description.abstractIn Tanzania women, farmers are main producers of agricultural food products, yet they don't have legal ownership of land. Customary practices often require women to access land through their husbands, fathers, brothers, or other men who control the land. Men as the heads of household, control everything including the type of crops to cultivate and the price. The fact that women farmers do not have legal ownership of land makes them vulnerable and decreases agricultural productivity. When women lose their connection to this male relative, either through death, divorce or migration, they can lose their land, home, and means of supporting themselves and their families. In the Sukuma tribe, the subject of this case study, many women do not have knowledge about their rights. Instead, they believe what they are told by their elders according to their culture. In the Sukuma society men are the heads of the household and women have no say in any decision about any family matter. The Sukuma tribe are still very conservative and continue to practice harmful traditions that affect agricultural production and the economy. This study used qualitative interviews, observations, note-taking and artifacts method to determine how cultural practices impact Sukuma women farmers land ownership. The findings show that large proportion of both men and women in the Sukuma society still lacks formal education, and is ignorant about their rights. Many believe in their subjective norms which are derived from beliefs about what their elders, traditional leaders, and ancestors (because these are the people they trust) say or think the person should do and the individual's motivation to comply with their wishes. Recommendations are made to put emphasis on education both formal and informal for both women and men so as to understand human rights and to change their behavior and perceptions about women farmers' rights to resources. The Sukuma tribe has many clans with different cultural practices, therefore generalization should be made very carefully. More research should be conducted to identify the differences for easy planning and implementing land programs and strategies in Sukuma communities and Tanzania as a whole.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
dc.subjectCultureen_US
dc.subjectGenderen_US
dc.subjectResource distributionen_US
dc.titleSocio-Cultural Practices That Impact Women Farmers' Land Ownership: A Case of Sukuma Women in Tanzaniaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentAgricultural and Extension Educationen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Extension Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRudd, Rickie Duaneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWestfall-Rudd, Donnaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArchibald, Thomasen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record