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dc.contributor.authorDelp, Cynthia Dawnen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-15T06:00:13Z
dc.date.available2016-10-15T06:00:13Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-23en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5033en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73217
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the study was to document and examine the experiences and perspectives of students and staff who were affected by the closure of Mount Rogers Combined School in 2010. Mount Rogers Combined School was established in Grayson County, Virginia, by the concerted efforts of volunteers and community members who valued education and considered schooling a top priority for the area. The original four-room school was built of rocks and housed grades 1 through 11, taught by four teachers, one of whom also served as the principal (Grayson County School Board [GCSB], 1993). In 1990, it was the smallest school in the Commonwealth of Virginia (United States Department of Agriculture, 1990). A review of early education in Virginia and early education in Grayson County is documented to place the study in historical context. A brief history of Grayson County is also included in this paper. The qualitative case study documents the experiences and perspectives of the students and staff who went through the school's closure. Both primary and secondary sources were used to complete the study including interviews of students and staff who worked at or attended the school, reviews of official records and documents found in archives, examination of personal manuscripts, inspection of artifacts, and study of general histories. School divisions close and consolidate schools to improve instructional programs for students, offset student enrollment declines, provide adequate facilities for learning, and for economic savings. Communication, developing relationships, transportation, extracurricular activities and course offerings are variables that should be considered when planning a school closure. While transportation and changes in relationships are particular challenges, the overall benefits for former staff members include better access to more resources and professional development opportunities. Former students tend to adapt better than staff members when schools close due to more course offerings and access to a broader range of extracurricular activities. The findings are aligned with the literature that was reviewed for the study.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectrural schoolsen_US
dc.subjectcombined schoolsen_US
dc.subjectschool closureen_US
dc.subjectGrayson Countyen_US
dc.subjectAppalachian schoolsen_US
dc.titleMount Rogers Combined School: The Experiences and Perspectives of Students and Staff When a Community School Closeden_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreeEDDen_US
thesis.degree.nameEDDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairTripp, Norman Wayneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSellers, James Louisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDrewry, Julie Anneen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMagliaro, Susan Gen_US


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