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dc.contributor.authorSuh, Min Jaeen_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-28T06:00:33Z
dc.date.available2016-10-28T06:00:33Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-06en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:4801en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73339
dc.description.abstractThe construction industry's two main certifications are Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and Energy Star. To achieve the triple bottom line of sustainability for these certifications, both certifications should make a positive impact individually as well as mutually, with their impact extending to the surrounding neighborhood. This research examined the spillover effect of LEED and/or Energy Star certified office buildings on the property values of other buildings in their neighborhood in Manhattan, New York City from an economic standpoint. The spatial analysis approach using the Geographic Information System and the statistical analysis approach based on the Hedonic Price Model and the Linear Mixed Effect Model were applied to identify the geographical distribution of LEED and/or Energy Star certified office buildings and their other buildings in their neighborhoods and analyze the impact of the former on the latter. The results were as follows: 1) There was a significant correlation between a LEED and/or Energy Star certified office building and the unit market values of its adjoining buildings through the unit market values of the certified office building, the LEED and/or Energy Star certification achievement, and the major features of LEED certification; 2) There was a varying spillover effect of the certified office building on the median unit market value of buildings depending on their proximities to a LEED and/or Energy Star certified office building. This research provides a firm foundation for further efforts to quantify the spillover effect of LEED and/or Energy Star certification on a neighborhood from an economic standpoint, thus supporting and encouraging growth in the local real estate market and benefitting not only the owners, developers, and investors of the certified office building but also the owners of neighboring buildings.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectLEEDen_US
dc.subjectEnergy Staren_US
dc.subjecttriple bottom line of sustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectmutual growthen_US
dc.subjectspillover effecten_US
dc.subjectmarket valueen_US
dc.subjectwalking distanceen_US
dc.subjectneighborhooden_US
dc.subjectGISen_US
dc.subjecthedonic price modelen_US
dc.subjectlinear mixed effect modelen_US
dc.titleThe Spillover Effect of Proximity to LEED-Energy Star Certified Office Buildings On Neighborhood Market Valueen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Design and Planningen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnvironmental Design and Planningen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairPearce, Annie R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZhang, Yangen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAuchey, Flynn L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMitchell, Kimberly Jeanen_US


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