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dc.contributor.authorTasooji, Mohammaden_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-29T07:00:13Z
dc.date.available2016-11-29T07:00:13Z
dc.date.issued2014-06-06en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:3199en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73511
dc.description.abstractNew vigorous regulations have been established for decreasing the allowable formaldehyde emissions from nonstructural wood based composites. Two main sources of formaldehyde emission in non-structural wood based composites are adhesive and wood. Adhesives are quite well known and great efforts have been conducted to decrease their formaldehyde content; however formaldehyde emission from wood has received little attention and it is not completely understood. Wood-borne formaldehyde emission exists in a complex equilibrium in wood matrix. The reaction between formaldehyde and wood hydroxyl groups/water can hinder the complete formaldehyde extraction. In order to have a complete formaldehyde extraction, a stronger nucleophile than hydroxyl and water groups is needed. In this study cross-linked poly (allylamine) (PAA) beads were synthesized and used as a strong nucleophile to extract all the biogenic and synthetic free-formaldehyde within the woody matrix of never-heated and heat-treated Virginia pines; the results were compared to simple water extraction. A new formaldehyde capturing device was also developed using a serum bottle. Results showed that there was no advantage of using PAA beads over simple water extraction for extracting woody matrix free-formaldehyde. This means that simple water extraction can extract all the free-formaldehyde from the woody matrix. It was also found that thermal treatment resulted in generating more wood-borne formaldehyde. The other important finding was the new developed formaldehyde capturing device. The device was very promising for detecting wood-borne formaldehyde from very small pieces of wood (5-70 mg) and can be very useful in future studies.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectNative-wood formaldehyde emissionen_US
dc.subjectliquid extractionen_US
dc.subjectpoly (allylamine) beadsen_US
dc.subjectwater extractionen_US
dc.titleNovel Liquid extraction method for detecting Native-wood Formaldehydeen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForest Resources and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForest Productsen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFrazier, Charles E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoman, Marenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRenneckar, Scott Harolden_US


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