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dc.contributor.authorPasymowski, Stefan G.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-28T07:00:35Z
dc.date.available2016-12-28T07:00:35Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-06en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5226en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/73872
dc.description.abstractMild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a medical diagnosis that is conceptualized as existing on a continuum between normal cognitive aging and dementia. While a growing body of research has established the impact of this condition on family members' emotional well-being, as well as the quality of family relationships, the reciprocal impact of family dynamics and the family environment on illness course has received much less attention. Expressed emotion (EE) is a measure of the family emotional climate that has been established as being highly predictive of relapse and symptom exacerbation for a variety of mental health disorders. The recent integration of attribution theory with EE has offered new insights into the underlying attitudes and beliefs that give rise to it. This mixed methods study applied the attribution model of EE to test the validity of EE in predicting the illness course of MCI, and to identify family members' attributions regarding MCI-related behaviors and symptoms that underlie their EE status. The study sample included 57 family dyads consisting of a person with MCI and a family member providing primary care or assistance. The results of the ANCOVA did not support the hypothesis that EE status would predict changes in the non-cognitive features of MCI over time. However, methods of thematic analysis revealed four major themes, or care partner attributional stances: (a) non-blaming, (b) blaming, (c) variable, and (d) no identified. The analysis also revealed three subthemes, or attributional styles, within the variable stance: (a) ambivalent, (b) mixed, and (c) complex. These attributional stances and styles intersected with family EE status in notable ways and form the basis for future research in this area, as well as clinical interventions with these families that promote adaptation to the illness.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectmild cognitive impairmenten_US
dc.subjectexpressed emotionen_US
dc.subjectattribution theoryen_US
dc.titleExpressed Emotion in Families with Mild Cognitive Impairmenten_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHuman Developmenten_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHuman Developmenten_US
dc.contributor.committeechairDolbin-MacNab, Megan Leighen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBlieszner, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPiercy, Fred P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoberto, Karen A.en_US


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