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dc.contributor.authorAhlswede, Benjamin Jamesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-12T07:00:11Z
dc.date.available2017-01-12T07:00:11Z
dc.date.issued2015-07-21en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:5943en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/74269
dc.description.abstractForests affect climate by absorbing CO₂ but also by altering albedo, latent heat flux, and sensible heat flux. In this study we used the Community Earth System Model to assess the biophysical effect of North American temperate forests on climate and how this effect changes with location, tree type, and forest management. We calculated the change in annual temperature and energy balance associated with afforestation with either needle leaf evergreen trees (NET) or broadleaf deciduous trees (BDT) and between forests with high and low leaf-area indices (LAI). Afforestation from crops to forests resulted in lower albedo and higher sensible heat flux but no consistent difference in latent heat flux. Forests were consistently warmer than crops at high latitudes and colder at lower latitudes. In North America, the temperature response from afforestation shifted from warming to cooling between 34° N and 40° N for ground temperature and between 21° N and 25° N for near surface air temperature. NET tended to have lower albedo, higher sensible heat flux and warmer temperatures than BDT. The effect of tree PFT was larger than the effect of afforestation in the south and in the mid-Atlantic. Increasing LAI, a proxy for increased management intensity, caused a cooling effect in both tree types, but NET responded more strongly and albedo decreased while albedo increased for BDT. Our results show that forests' location, tree type, and management intensity can have nearly equal biophysical effects on temperature. A forest will have maximum biophysical cooling effect if it is in the south, composed of broadleaf PFT, and is managed to maximize leaf area index.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this Item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjecttemperate forestsen_US
dc.subjectclimateen_US
dc.subjectbiophysicalen_US
dc.subjectalbedoen_US
dc.subjectlatent heat fluxen_US
dc.subjectsensible heat fluxen_US
dc.subjectforest managementen_US
dc.subjectleaf area index (lai)en_US
dc.subjectcommunity earth system model (cesm)en_US
dc.subjectneedleleaf evergreenen_US
dc.subjectbroadleaf deciduousen_US
dc.subjectground temperatureen_US
dc.subjectair temperatureen_US
dc.titleWhat to plant and where to plant it; Modeling the biophysical effects of North America temperate forests on climate using the Community Earth System Modelen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForest Resources and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForestryen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairThomas, R. Quinnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWynne, Randolph H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrahm, Brian D.en_US


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