Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorChen, Z.en
dc.contributor.authorZhou, C.en
dc.contributor.authorXiao, S.en
dc.contributor.authorWang, W.en
dc.contributor.authorGuan, C.en
dc.contributor.authorHua, H.en
dc.contributor.authorYuan, X.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-14T04:05:15Zen
dc.date.available2017-01-14T04:05:15Zen
dc.date.issued2014-02-25en
dc.identifier.citationChen, Z.; Zhou, C. M.; Xiao, S. H.; Wang, W.; Guan, C. G.; Hua, H.; Yuan, X. L., "New Ediacara fossils preserved in marine limestone and their ecological implications," Scientific Reports 4:4180, (2014). DOI: 10.1038/srep04180.en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/74309en
dc.description.abstractEdiacara fossils are central to our understanding of animal evolution on the eve of the Cambrian explosion, because some of them likely represent stem-group marine animals. However, some of the iconic Ediacara fossils have also been interpreted as terrestrial lichens or microbial colonies. Our ability to test these hypotheses is limited by a taphonomic bias that most Ediacara fossils are preserved in sandstones and siltstones. Here we report several iconic Ediacara fossils and an annulated tubular fossil (reconstructed as an erect epibenthic organism with uniserial arranged modular units), from marine limestone of the 551-541 Ma Dengying Formation in South China. These fossils significantly expand the ecological ranges of several key Ediacara taxa and support that they are marine organisms rather than terrestrial lichens or microbial colonies. Their close association with abundant bilaterian burrows also indicates that they could tolerate and may have survived moderate levels of bioturbation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipChinese Ministry of Science and Technologyen
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Natural Science Foundation of Chinaen
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. National Science Foundationen
dc.description.sponsorshipChinese Academy of Sciencesen
dc.format.extent? - ? (10) page(s)en
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000331887200001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unporteden
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/en
dc.subjectSOUTH-AUSTRALIA COASTALen
dc.subjectYANGTZE GORGES AREAen
dc.subjectMACKENZIE MOUNTAINSen
dc.subjectNORTHWESTERN CANADAen
dc.subjectTRACE FOSSILen
dc.subjectGAOJIASHAN LAGERSTATTEen
dc.subjectDENGYING FORMATIONen
dc.subjectMICROBIAL MATSen
dc.subjectDEEP MARINEen
dc.subjectCHINAen
dc.titleNew Ediacara fossils preserved in marine limestone and their ecological implicationsen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en
dc.contributor.departmentGeosciencesen
dc.title.serialScientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/srep04180en
dc.identifier.volume4en
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Scienceen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/COS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/Geosciencesen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported