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dc.contributor.authorMurthy, Ambika Mosale Venkateshen
dc.contributor.authorNi, Yan-Yanen
dc.contributor.authorMeng, Xiang-Jinen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Chenmingen
dc.coverage.spatialSwitzerlanden
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-15T15:15:55Zen
dc.date.available2017-01-15T15:15:55Zen
dc.date.issued2015-04-14en
dc.identifier.citationMurthy, A.M.V.; Ni, Y.; Meng, X.; Zhang, C. Production and Evaluation of Virus-Like Particles Displaying Immunogenic Epitopes of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV). Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16, 8382-8396.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/74316en
dc.description.abstractPorcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the most significant infectious disease currently affecting the swine industry worldwide. Several inactivated and modified live vaccines (MLV) have been developed to curb PRRSV infections. However, the efficacy and safety of these vaccines are unsatisfactory, and hence, there is a strong demand for the development of new PRRS universal vaccines. Virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines are gaining increasing acceptance compared to subunit vaccines, as they present the antigens in a more veritable conformation and are readily recognized by the immune system. Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) has been successfully used as a carrier for more than 100 viral sequences. In this study, hybrid HBcAg VLPs were generated by fusion of the conserved protective epitopes of PRRSV and expressed in E. coli. An optimized purification protocol was developed to obtain hybrid HBcAg VLP protein from the inclusion bodies. This hybrid HBcAg VLP protein self-assembled to 23-nm VLPs that were shown to block virus infection of susceptible cells when tested on MARC 145 cells. Together with the safety of non-infectious and non-replicable VLPs and the low cost of production through E. coli fermentation, this hybrid VLP could be a promising vaccine candidate for PRRS.en
dc.format.extent8382 - 8396 page(s)en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPIen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25874763en
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectCell Lineen
dc.subjectCercopithecus aethiopsen
dc.subjectEpitopesen
dc.subjectPorcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndromeen
dc.subjectPorcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virusen
dc.subjectProtein Refoldingen
dc.subjectSolubilityen
dc.subjectSwineen
dc.subjectVaccines, Virus-Like Particleen
dc.titleProduction and evaluation of virus-like particles displaying immunogenic epitopes of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)en
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological Systems Engineeringen
dc.contributor.departmentBiomedical Sciences and Pathobiologyen
dc.title.serialInt J Mol Scien
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijms16048382en
dc.type.otherResearch Support, Non-U.S. Gov'ten
dc.identifier.volume16en
dc.identifier.issue4en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.identifier.eissn1422-0067en
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Biological Systems Engineeringen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/CALS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Distinguished Professorsen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicineen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiologyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/CVM T&R Facultyen


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International