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dc.contributor.authorDavis, Kayla L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-01T09:00:20Z
dc.date.available2017-02-01T09:00:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-31en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:9441en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/74874
dc.description.abstractThe study that I detail in the following thesis is a component of a three-part collaborative project to provide the U. S. National Park Service and Cape Cod National Seashore (CCNS) with data needed to inform management decisions for protection of the endangered northwest Atlantic Roseate Tern (ROST) during fall pre-migratory staging. This study was designed to address objectives related to hatch-year (HY) ROST behavior and survival in response to human and non-human activities and environmental variables at CCNS. Behavioral data showed that disturbance, specifically human and non-human activities, were related to increased HY ROST locomotion (flying and walking). We also found that environmental variables, including day of season and time of day were related to increased locomotion. Flock-level HY ROST begging behavior was decreased in the presence of human disturbance, but we did not see the same effect at the individual level. We found no evidence that the observed behavioral effect of disturbance resulted in decreased residency, recruitment, or staging duration of HY ROST at CCNS. Our work demonstrates that disturbance events around staging flocks have behavioral consequences, but it is unknown whether HY ROST behavioral responses to disturbances are great enough to impact survival after departure from CCNS. A conservative and proactive management strategy to minimize the potential for negative carryover effects on survival should limit ROST exposure to disturbance, particularly human activities, by exclosing staging sites between mid-July–mid-September to encompass the period of time when the highest number of ROST use CCNS.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectRoseate Ternen_US
dc.subjectHatch-yearen_US
dc.subjectDisturbanceen_US
dc.subjectSurvivalen_US
dc.subjectBehavioren_US
dc.subjectPre-migratory Stagingen_US
dc.titleDisturbance and Environmental Effects on Staging Roseate Tern Parent-Offspring Interactions and Hatch Year Survival at Cape Cod National Seashoreen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentFisheries and Wildlife Sciencesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and Wildlife Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKarpanty, Sarah M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFraser, James D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCatlin, Daniel Herberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWalters, Jeffrey R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCohen, Jonathan Barryen_US


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