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dc.contributor.authorHolder, Amara L.en
dc.contributor.authorMarr, Linsey C.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-05T01:18:05Zen
dc.date.available2017-02-05T01:18:05Zen
dc.date.issued2013-01-01en
dc.identifier.citationAmara L. Holder, Linsey C. Marr, "Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interface", BioMed Research International, vol. 2013, Article ID 328934, 11 pages, 2013. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/328934en
dc.identifier.issn2314-6133en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/74935en
dc.description.abstractSilver nanoparticles are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials in consumer products. Some of these products are likely to be aerosolized, making silver nanoparticles a high priority for inhalation toxicity assessment. To study the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles, we have exposed cultured lung cells to them at the air-liquid interface. Cells were exposed to suspensions of silver or nickel oxide (positive control) nanoparticles at concentrations of 2.6, 6.6, and 13.2 μg cm⁻² (volume concentrations of 10, 25, and 50 μg ml⁻¹) and to 0.7 μg cm⁻² silver or 2.1 μg cm⁻² nickel oxide aerosol at the air-liquid interface. Unlike a number of in vitro studies employing suspensions of silver nanoparticles, which have shown strong toxic effects, both suspensions and aerosolized nanoparticles caused negligible cytotoxicity and only a mild inflammatory response, in agreement with animal exposures. Additionally, we have eveloped a novel method using a differential mobility analyzer to select aerosolized nanoparticles of a single diameter to assess the size-dependent toxicity of silver nanoparticles.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology EF-0830093en
dc.description.sponsorshipVirginia Tech Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Scienceen
dc.format.extent? - ? (11) page(s)en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHindawi Publishing Corporationen
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000314416300001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectBiotechnology & Applied Microbiologyen
dc.subjectMedicine, Research & Experimentalen
dc.subjectResearch & Experimental Medicineen
dc.subjectHUMAN HEPATOMA-CELLSen
dc.subjectSPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATSen
dc.subjectHUMAN LUNG-CELLSen
dc.subjectIN-VITROen
dc.subjectPARTICULATE MATTERen
dc.subjectINHALATION TOXICITYen
dc.subjectEPITHELIAL-CELLSen
dc.subjectEXPOSURE SYSTEMen
dc.subjectDIESEL EXHAUSTen
dc.subjectPARTICLESen
dc.titleToxicity of Silver Nanoparticles at the Air-Liquid Interfaceen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.versionPublished versionen
dc.contributor.departmentCivil and Environmental Engineeringen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS)en
dc.title.serialBioMed Research Internationalen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1155/2013/328934en
dc.type.dcmitypetexten
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Engineeringen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Engineering/Civil & Environmental Engineeringen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Engineering/COE T&R Facultyen


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