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dc.contributor.authorPrussin, Aaron J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMarr, Linsey C.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-05T01:56:00Z
dc.date.available2017-02-05T01:56:00Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-22
dc.identifier.issn2049-2618en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/74937
dc.description.abstractEach day people are exposed to millions of bioaerosols, including whole microorganisms, which can have both beneficial and detrimental effects. The next chapter in understanding the airborne microbiome of the built environment is characterizing the various sources of airborne microorganisms and the relative contribution of each. We have identified the following eight major categories of sources of airborne bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the built environment: humans; pets; plants; plumbing systems; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems; mold; dust resuspension; and the outdoor environment. Certain species are associated with certain sources, but the full potential of source characterization and source apportionment has not yet been realized. Ideally, future studies will quantify detailed emission rates of microorganisms from each source and will identify the relative contribution of each source to the indoor air microbiome. This information could then be used to probe fundamental relationships between specific sources and human health, to design interventions to improve building health and human health, or even to provide evidence for forensic investigations.
dc.format.extent? - ? (10) page(s)en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBiomed Central Ltden_US
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000367061200001&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen_US
dc.subjectMicrobiomeen_US
dc.subjectMicrobesen_US
dc.subjectIndoorsen_US
dc.subjectBioaerosolsen_US
dc.subjectEmissionsen_US
dc.subjectReviewen_US
dc.subjectINDOOR-OUTDOOR RELATIONSHIPSen_US
dc.subjectHOUSE-DUSTen_US
dc.subjectPARTICLE NUMBERen_US
dc.subjectHOME DAMPNESSen_US
dc.subjectMICROBIOLOGICAL HAZARDSen_US
dc.subjectBACTERIAL COMMUNITIESen_US
dc.subjectPULMONARY HEMORRHAGEen_US
dc.subjectSIZE DISTRIBUTIONSen_US
dc.subjectPARTICULATE MATTERen_US
dc.subjectSTACHYBOTRYS-ATRAen_US
dc.titleSources of airborne microorganisms in the built environmenten_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereed
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en_US
dc.rights.holderThe Author(s)en_US
dc.title.serialMicrobiome
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s40168-015-0144-z
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue1
dc.type.dcmitypeText
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Engineering
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Engineering/Civil & Environmental Engineering
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Engineering/COE T&R Faculty


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International