Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSt Germain, Michael J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T19:49:06Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T19:49:06Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-25en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-05162012-122931en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/76770
dc.description.abstractBats occupy diverse and unique niches and are regarded as important components in maintaining ecosystem health. They are major consumers of nocturnal insects, serve as pollinators, seed disperser, and provide important economic benefits as consumers of agricultural and forest pest insects. Bats have been proposed as good indicators of the integrity of natural communities because they integrate a number of resource attributes and may show population declines quickly if a resource attribute is missing. Establishing community- and population-level data, and understanding species interactions is especially important in changing landscapes and for species whose populations levels are threatened by outside factors of anthropomorphic disturbance from hibernacular visitation to energy production and fungal pathogens. For these reasons I have set out to establish habitat use patterns, detection probabilities, spatial and temporal occupancy, and investigate species interactions. This thesis is broken down into three distinct chapters each intended to be a stand-alone document. The first establishes the basic ecology from natural history accounts, provides an overview of the various sampling strategies, and gives a comprehensive description of the study area. The seconds sets out to identify the factors influencing detection probabilities and occupancy of six sympatric bats species and provide insight into habitat use patterns. The third examines spatial and temporal activity patterns and investigates species interactions. This study can provide understanding into the secretive and poorly understood patterns of free flying bats across the landscape. It can also deliver useful information to land managers regarding potential changes in landscape practices for the conservation of bat species.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjecttwo species modelingen_US
dc.subjecttemporal overlappingen_US
dc.subjectspatial co-occurrenceen_US
dc.subjectspecies interaction factoren_US
dc.subjectproportion of area occupieden_US
dc.subjectPerimyotis subflavusen_US
dc.subjectoccupancyen_US
dc.subjectNycticeius humeralisen_US
dc.subjectMyotis septentrionalisen_US
dc.subjectMyotis lucifugusen_US
dc.subjectmilitary landsen_US
dc.subjectLasiurus borealisen_US
dc.subjectEptesicus fuscusen_US
dc.subjectdetection probabilityen_US
dc.subjectAnaBaten_US
dc.subjectactivity indexen_US
dc.titleBat Habitat Ecology Using Remote Acoustical Detectors at the Army National Guard Maneuver Training Center - Fort Pickett, Blackstone, Virginiaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentFisheries and Wildlife Sciencesen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and Wildlife Sciencesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKelly, Marcella J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStauffer, Dean F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFord, W. Marken_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-05162012-122931/en_US
dc.date.sdate2012-05-16en_US
dc.date.rdate2016-10-18
dc.date.adate2012-06-12en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record