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dc.contributor.authorGroen, Cassandra J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-12T08:00:15Z
dc.date.available2017-04-12T08:00:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-11en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:10866en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/77392
dc.description.abstractAs evidenced by a large body of research within the engineering education community, those individuals who do not maintain a sense of belonging, identify with engineering groups, or perceive themselves as engineers are more likely to leave the profession. However, little is known about the ways in which engineering students construct or develop their personal and professional identities as influenced by the disciplinary values, behaviors, and practices learned during the undergraduate education experience. In order to deepen the understanding of professional identity formation within the engineering disciplines, a grounded theory study was conducted to explore the experiences of 31 sophomore, junior, and senior level undergraduate students enrolled in a civil engineering program. Upon conducting an iterative process of data collection and analysis, a theory of professional identity negotiation emerged from interviews depicting participants' experiences. This theory titled Negotiating Equilibrium: Advancing from Outsider to Insider or the AOI Model, captures the identities negotiated by students as they iteratively define, adjust, and readjust definitions of self and profession to maintain a balance between their personal self and the learned disciplinary identity of the civil engineering profession. As participants gained this balance, they began to see themselves as professionals and advance from an outsider (i.e., one not belonging to the civil engineering profession) to an insider (i.e., one belonging to the civil engineering profession). The AOI Model provides a framework for researchers to further explore professional identity formation, promotes the development of identity-influencing coursework and instructor teaching approaches, and inspires future research trajectories in engineering and civil engineering education.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectidentityen_US
dc.subjectgrounded theoryen_US
dc.subjectprofessional identityen_US
dc.subjectidentity formationen_US
dc.subjectconstructivismen_US
dc.titleAdvancing from Outsider to Insider: A Grounded Theory of Professional Identity Negotiationen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEngineering Educationen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEngineering Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairMcNair, Elizabeth D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeechairSimmons, Denise Rutledgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCreamer, Elizabeth G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberParetti, Marie C.en_US


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