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dc.contributor.authorWalker, Lorraine W.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-09T18:30:43Z
dc.date.available2017-06-09T18:30:43Z
dc.date.issued2000-08-28en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-11292000-140421en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/77990
dc.description.abstractFor many decades, school leadership has been conceptualized in a variety of ways attempting to identify the critical elements necessary for effective school leadership. The expertise required for today's schools appears to be different from that required in the past, particularly as school leaders are expected to initiate change and "restructure" in order to obtain new and improved educational results. Traditional managerial skills, once deemed appropriate and effective for school administration, are now being replaced by styles that focus on cooperation and consideration, community building, open communication, and involvement with others. These behaviors appear to be present in women as they demonstrate their effectiveness in leadership roles as principals and superintendents. This descriptive study offers an in-depth look at the administrative behavior of three women. It documents their experiences and perspectives as high school principals. The purpose of the study is to contribute to the growing body of research on female leaders necessary to challenge the existing theories on school administration, which are based on traditional business management theory and formulated using an androcentric conceptual framework. Naturalistic inquiry guided the present study, which employed qualitative research methodology. Participant observations, complemented by interviews and reflective conversations, provided the data for analysis using grounded theory. A computer software program Ethnograph (Qualis, 1998) facilitated the organization and analysis of data. Case narratives, case reports, and a cross-case analysis report three women's behavior in their role as high school principals. Major conclusions include: (a) Each principal demonstrated a unique style of administrative behavior which seemed effectively matched to the needs of the school organization; (b) Each principal demonstrated a strong set of collegial or relational behaviors that focused on building community in order to support the school programs; and (c) Each principal demonstrated an ethic of care informed by a sense of fairness and loyalty to the policies and procedures associated with their bureaucratic organizational environment. The ethic of care that guided each principal's style suggests that these principals exercise a kind of power associated more with "effective agency" than with "command and control" power typically associated with traditional leadership. Additional research is needed to document the female leadership experience in schools in order to challenge and transform current administrative theory; research is also needed to explore the notion of "effective agency" as power. Practitioners, researchers, and other interested educational professionals are invited to use the behaviors identified in this study to reflect upon their own styles, because changing our schools is inevitably bound up with changing ourselves.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectadministrative styleen_US
dc.subjecthigh schoolen_US
dc.subjectadministrative behaviorsen_US
dc.subjectfemale principalsen_US
dc.subjecteducational leadershipen_US
dc.subjectgrounded theoryen_US
dc.titleAn Analysis of the Administrative Behavior of Three Female High School Principalsen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairCurcio, Claire Cole Vaughten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGordon, Deannaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCline, Marvin Geralden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKrill, Cecelia W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSingh, Kusumen_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-11292000-140421/en_US
dc.date.sdate2000-11-29en_US
dc.date.rdate2001-12-08
dc.date.adate2000-12-08en_US


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