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dc.contributor.authorMcCusker, Maureen Elizabethen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-13T19:44:14Z
dc.date.available2017-06-13T19:44:14Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-26en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-06112015-213859en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/78142
dc.description.abstractLeadership emergence is best conceptualized as a complex, multi-level process arising from the dynamic interplay of all elements in the process: group members, relations, and context (Day, 2014). This study seeks to simultaneously examine to the role of each in the leadership emergence process by assessing leader and follower traits, their trait similarity, task, behaviors, and the network itself. Using a rotation design, 99 cadets in groups of three completed four tasks with alternating partners and subsequently provided sociometric ratings of each of their group members. Data was analyzed using Exponential Random Graph Modeling, which controls for endogenous group effects. In general, there was a tendency toward nominating others as leaders. High scores on dominance and intelligence predicted leadership emergence, and low scores on dominance predicted follower emergence. The type of task did not affect leadership emergence. Perceived leader behavior unexpectedly reduced the likelihood of nominating another as a leader. Results from this study highlight the importance of studying all components of leadership process and are once step closer toward doing so completely and accurately.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectpersonalityen_US
dc.subjectprocessen_US
dc.subjectERGMen_US
dc.subjectsocial networksen_US
dc.subjectfolloweren_US
dc.subjectleaderen_US
dc.titleA Dyadic Approach to Leadership Emergenceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFoti, Roseanne J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHauenstein, Neil M. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBraun, Michael T.en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-06112015-213859/en_US
dc.date.sdate2015-06-11en_US
dc.date.rdate2015-07-13
dc.date.adate2015-07-13en_US


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