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dc.contributor.authorShah, Yashna Jitendraen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-13T19:44:15Z
dc.date.available2017-06-13T19:44:15Z
dc.date.issued2015-06-09en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-07012015-222131en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/78144
dc.description.abstractRole models can serve as a means to counteract the prevalent 'Think Leader, Think Male' stereotype. This study was designed to assess the impact of role model similarity on women's leadership self-efficacy, task performance and future leadership behavior, using two conceptualizations of similarity – match with leadership self-concept and attainability of the role model. Additionally, the process by which one's self-perceptions of leadership impact judgments of one's own behavior was also investigated. Participants were presented with a role model vignette in a laboratory setting, following which they complete a leadership task. Results indicated that there were no significant effects of the interaction of the two role model manipulations of various leadership outcomes. However, match of role model with one's self-concept did impact one's leadership self-efficacy. Results also indicated that agentic leader prototypes partially mediated the relation between individuals' self-concept and self-judgments, such that participants whose self-concept matched the role model activated the agentic leader prototype. Overall findings suggest that match with one's self concept plays an important role in role models being perceived as similar to the self, which can have important implications for women's leadership development.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectleadershipen_US
dc.subjectgenderen_US
dc.subjectrole modelsen_US
dc.subjectleadership self-concepten_US
dc.subjectself-perceptionsen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Role Model Similarity on Women's Leadership Outcomesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFoti, Roseanne J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHauenstein, Neil M. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAxsom, Danny K.en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-07012015-222131/en_US
dc.date.sdate2015-07-01en_US
dc.date.rdate2015-07-15
dc.date.adate2015-07-15en_US


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