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dc.contributor.authorPierce, Timothy M. Jr.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-13T19:44:19Z
dc.date.available2017-06-13T19:44:19Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-22en_US
dc.identifier.otheretd-07292016-100536en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/78148
dc.description.abstractEfficiency is a driving constraint for electrical power systems as global energy demands are ever increasing. Followed by the introduction of diesel generators, electricity has become available in more locations than ever. However, operating a diesel generator on its own is not the most energy efficient. This is because the high crest factor loads, of many applications, decrease the fuel efficiency of a hydrocarbon generator. To understand this, we need to understand how an electrical load affects a generator. Starting with a load profile, a system designer must choose a generator to meet peak demand, marking the first instance where a load profile has influence over a generator. This decision will insure that brownouts do not occur, but, this will lead to poor energy efficiency. We say this because a generator is most energy efficient under heavier loads, meaning, during lighter loads, more fuel will be consumed to produce the same amount of energy. While this may be fine if the peak load was close to the average load, however, the actual crest factor for a typical residential load profile is much higher. This gap between peak and average load means that a generator will spend most of its time operating at its most inefficient point. To compensate for this, and reduce fuel consumption, the Mechatronics Lab at Virginia Tech has developed a mobile hybrid power system (MHPS) to address this problem. The solution was to augment a diesel generator with a battery pack. This allowed us to constrain the generator so that it only operates with fixed efficiency. It is the theory behind this system that will be covered in this thesis.
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsI hereby certify that, if appropriate, I have obtained and attached hereto a written permission statement from the owner(s) of each third party copyrighted matter to be included in my thesis, dissertation, or project report, allowing distribution as specified below. I certify that the version I submitted is the same as that approved by my advisory committee. I hereby grant to Virginia Tech or its agents the non-exclusive license to archive and make accessible, under the conditions specified below, my thesis, dissertation, or project report in whole or in part in all forms of media, now or hereafter known. I retain all other ownership rights to the copyright of the thesis, dissertation or project report. I also retain the right to use in future works (such as articles or books) all or part of this thesis, dissertation, or project report.en_US
dc.subjectpower factor correctionen_US
dc.subjectload profileen_US
dc.subjectenergy storageen_US
dc.subjectmobile hybrid power systemen_US
dc.subjectfuel consumptionen_US
dc.titleMobile Hybrid Power System Theory of Operationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairWicks, Alfred L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBurgos, Rolandoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSouthward, Steveen_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttp://scholar.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-07292016-100536/en_US
dc.date.sdate2016-07-29en_US
dc.date.rdate2016-08-08
dc.date.adate2016-08-08en_US


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