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dc.contributorVirginia Techen
dc.contributor.authorOvink, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorEbert, Kimen
dc.contributor.authorOkamoto, Dinaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-20T18:53:03Zen
dc.date.available2017-07-20T18:53:03Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05-18en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/78386en
dc.description.abstractA symbolic politics approach contends that the meanings policy proposals convey, and the audiences they attract, may matter more than whether they become law. Yet, we know little about the sociopolitical conditions prompting lawmakers to engage in symbolic politics. Using a new data set, we analyze proposals to expand or restrict in-state college tuition for undocumented students and find that national events—House of Representatives Bill 4437 and concurrent immigrant rights protests—encouraged state lawmakers to introduce exclusionary proposals, particularly in states with low shares of immigrants. Our findings indicate that “big events” moderate the influence of state sociopolitical conditions on symbolic political activity.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United Statesen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/en
dc.subjectundocumented immigrantsen
dc.subjectsymbolic politicsen
dc.subjectin-state tuition policiesen
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.titleSymbolic Politics of the State: The Case of In-state Tuition Bills for Undocumented Studentsen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.title.serialSociusen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1177/2378023116647969en
dc.identifier.volume2016en
dc.identifier.issue2en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States
License: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 United States