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dc.contributor.authorPeterson II, Andrew Jayen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-11T08:00:22Z
dc.date.available2017-08-11T08:00:22Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-10en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:12600en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/78693
dc.description.abstractThe design of current electromyography (EMG) systems focuses on specific applications. One design focuses on the use of bipolar electrodes to monitor a single muscle group. Several of these electrodes can then be used to monitor different muscles on the body simultaneously. Another design places many electrodes in an array on a limb or over a single muscle. One cannot be used for the other. Additionally the design of an EMG system must account for several sources of noise that can be orders of magnitude larger than the EMG signal itself. The goal of this work was to design an active EMG electrode that could be used as bipolar electrodes or in an electrode array. Two electrodes were designed and tested. One design only worked in bipolar and the other did not possess the desired noise immunity. Explanations to the behavior of the electrodes are presented along with possible modifications the the electrodes to achieve the desired performance.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectElectromyographyen_US
dc.subjectEMGen_US
dc.subjectsurface EMGen_US
dc.subjectEMG signalsen_US
dc.subjectEMG system designen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of a Modular Electromyography Systemen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairStilwell, Daniel J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeechairAsbeck, Alan Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBaumann, William T.en_US


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