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dc.contributorVirginia Techen
dc.contributor.authorBerns, Gregory S.en
dc.contributor.authorMcClure, Samuel M.en
dc.contributor.authorPagnoni, Guiseppeen
dc.contributor.authorMontague, P. Readen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-26T13:07:52Zen
dc.date.available2017-09-26T13:07:52Zen
dc.date.issued2001-04-15en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/79422en
dc.description.abstractCertain classes of stimuli, such as food and drugs, are highly effective in activating reward regions. We show in humans that activity in these regions can be modulated by the predictability of the sequenced delivery of two mildly pleasurable stimuli, orally delivered fruit juice and water. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the activity for rewarding stimuli in both the nucleus accumbens and medial orbitofrontal cortex was greatest when the stimuli were unpredictable. Moreover, the subjects’ stated preference for either juice or water was not directly correlated with activity in reward regions but instead was correlated with activity in sensorimotor cortex. For pleasurable stimuli, these findings suggest that predictability modulates the response of human reward regions, and subjective preference can be dissociated from this response.en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscienceen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectrewarden
dc.subjectdopamineen
dc.subjectfMRIen
dc.subjectreinforcementen
dc.subjectneural networken
dc.subjectnucleus accumbensen
dc.subjectstriatumen
dc.titlePredictability Modulates Human Brain Response to Rewarden
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.title.serialThe Journal of Neuroscienceen
dc.identifier.volume21en
dc.identifier.issue8en


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