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dc.contributor.authorMana, Francesco
dc.contributor.authorStephenson Jr., Max
dc.contributor.authorZanotti, Laura
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-06T13:28:22Z
dc.date.available2017-10-06T13:28:22Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/79523
dc.description.abstractThe United Nations lies at the heart of the international system established at the end of the Second World War. The maintenance of international peace and security was (and remains) the first of the purposes assigned to it. Its Charter defined norms that if respected, would make it a more effective instrument for preventing and resolving conflict than the inter-war League of Nations had ever been. Initially, the Cold War prevented the new United Nations from fulfilling many of its creators’ hopes and expectations, but its moment seemed at last to have come when the Cold War ended in 1989 (Goulding, 2003, p. 346).
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherACUNS
dc.relation.ispartofACUNS Quarterly Newsletter
dc.titleUnited Nations Invocations of the ‘Responsibility to Protect,’ State Sovereignty and State Actionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.title.serialACUNS Quarterly Newsletter: Issue 2, 2016
dc.identifier.volume2016
dc.identifier.issue2


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  • Strategic Growth Area: Policy [46]
    The Policy SGA integrates research and learning across multiple disciplines and levels of information to analyze and inform the complex decision-making for designing and implementing policy to anticipate, respond to, and manage social change.

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