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dc.contributor.authorStables, Christa Laurenen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-19T08:00:19Z
dc.date.available2017-10-19T08:00:19Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-18en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:12774en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/79700
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this project was improve the fundamental understanding of the wood-resin interaction, by looking at the relationship between the resin wetting onto wood and the resulting penetration into wood lumens. Wetting was analyzed with the sessile drop method, which observed the initial contact angle and change in contact angle over 35s. Penetration was measured within each individual tracheid. The Lucas-Washburn equation analyzed the wetting and penetration by calculating the penetration and comparing it to the measured penetration. Wetting of four resins was compared on 3 species, to improve the understanding of adhesive wetting behavior. This study agreed with previous research, that the non-aqueous resin exhibited favorable wetting and presumably better penetration than aqueous resins, with exception of urea-formaldehyde. Wetting and penetration of pMDI was studied on 5 wood species using the Lucas-Washburn equation. The wetting behaviors exhibited grain and species effects, which had implications on the resin availability for flake/strand-based composite products. The greater surface energy of loblolly pine most likely accounted for the significantly greater penetration of loblolly pine compared to Douglas-fir. The calculated penetration, via the Lucas-Washburn equation, exceeded the measured penetration, but it was concluded that the Lucas-Washburn equation predicted penetration reasonably well. Wetting and penetration of phenol-formaldehyde and subsequent adhesives was compared on 3 wood species using the Lucas-Washburn equation. All contact angles were unfavorable due to a skin formation. The Lucas-Washburn equation did not predict any penetration; however, penetration was observed with all systems. The findings suggest that the system was too complex for the Lucas-Washburn equation to be able to predict accurately.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectWettingen_US
dc.subjectPenetrationen_US
dc.subjectAdhesivesen_US
dc.subjectLucas-Washburn equationen_US
dc.subjectWooden_US
dc.titleWetting and Penetration Behavior of Resin/Wood Interfacesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentForest Resources and Environmental Conservationen_US
dc.description.degreeMSen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineForest Productsen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFrazier, Charles Een_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZink-Sharp, Audreyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRoman, Marenen_US


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