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dc.contributor.authorDugan, Hilary A.
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Sarah L.
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Samantha M.
dc.contributor.authorDoubek, Jonathan P.
dc.contributor.authorKrivak-Tetley, Flora E.
dc.contributor.authorSkaff, Nicholas K.
dc.contributor.authorSummers, Jamie C.
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Kaitlin J.
dc.contributor.authorMcCullough, Ian M.
dc.contributor.authorMorales-Williams, Ana M.
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Derek C.
dc.contributor.authorOuyang, Zutao
dc.contributor.authorScordo, Facundo
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Paul C.
dc.contributor.authorWeathers, Kathleen C.
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-26T14:43:21Z
dc.date.available2017-10-26T14:43:21Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-08
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/79797
dc.description.abstractThe highest densities of lakes on Earth are in north temperate ecosystems, where increasing urbanization and associated chloride runoff can salinize freshwaters and threaten lake water quality and the many ecosystem services lakes provide. However, the extent to which lake salinity may be changing at broad spatial scales remains unknown, leading us to first identify spatial patterns and then investigate the drivers of these patterns. Significant decadal trends in lake salinization were identified using a dataset of long-term chloride concentrations from 371 North American lakes. Landscape and climate metrics calculated for each site demonstrated that impervious land cover was a strong predictor of chloride trends in Northeast and Midwest North American lakes. As little as 1% impervious land cover surrounding a lake increased the likelihood of long-term salinization. Considering that 27% of large lakes in the United States have >1% impervious land cover around their perimeters, the potential for steady and long-term salinization of these aquatic systems is high. This study predicts that many lakes will exceed the aquatic life threshold criterion for chronic chloride exposure (230 mg L⁻¹), stipulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in the next 50 y if current trends continue.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project is a result of the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) Fellowship program and was supported by National Science Foundation Grants EF1137353 and EF1137327.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherNASen_US
dc.subjectlimnologyen_US
dc.subjectchlorideen_US
dc.subjectroad salten_US
dc.subjectimpervious surfaceen_US
dc.subjectecosystem servicesen_US
dc.titleSalting our freshwater lakesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.title.serialPNASen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.6073/pasta/455d73d4cb43514e503826211eba4e99
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue17en_US


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