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dc.contributor.authorSchiewer, Tana M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-22T09:00:24Z
dc.date.available2017-11-22T09:00:24Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-21en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:13147en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/80475
dc.description.abstractIn this case study, the author explores the nonprofit mission statement as a genre, its place within a genre ecology, and its communication through various genres. Theorizing the mission statement as a controlling and stabilizing force in a genre ecology, the author notes the potential of the mission statement to enact the genre function, "the authority a genre has even in the absence of its author. Noting the limitations of current genre ecology modeling (GEM), the author maps the genres, documents, and activities of a small community foundation using a revised form of GEM that more purposefully includes speech genres to map relationships; in this case study, the speech genres revealed how the mission statement is mediated through genres and activities. Further, observations and interviews revealed ideological conflicts of the organization's key stakeholders that resulted in clashes between key stakeholder values and the language of the nonprofit's mission (and other genres). Additionally, ideological consensus resulted in the addition of new organizational activities and genres, even though these activities are not in line with the language of the mission statement as written. Eventually, these activities become social facts, "ideas that the key stakeholders believe are in line with the mission when they are, in fact, in conflict with it. If these social facts are not re-aligned with the mission statement, new activities and genres are created and mediated by speech genres, potentially moving the organization further away from its purpose and goals. The author ultimately suggests a cycle of genre and activity production that will realign the social facts and the mission statement and encourage organizational leaders to return to the mission statement and change the language to reflect the organization's new reality.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectmissionen_US
dc.subjectgenreen_US
dc.subjectspeech actsen_US
dc.subjectsocial factsen_US
dc.subjectgenre ecologyen_US
dc.subjectnonprofiten_US
dc.titleThe Nonprofit Mission Statement as Genre: Speech Acts, Social Facts, and Ecologiesen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnglishen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric and Writingen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairPender, Kelly Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEvia Puerto, Carlosen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWarnick, Quinnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDubinsky, James M.en_US


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