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dc.contributor.authorStevens, Ann M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, ACen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarbach-Ad, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorBalcom, SAen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuchner, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorDaniel, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeStefano, JJen_US
dc.contributor.authorEl-Sayed, NMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrauwirth, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, VTen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcIver, KSen_US
dc.contributor.authorMelville, SBen_US
dc.contributor.authorMosser, DMen_US
dc.contributor.authorPopham, DLen_US
dc.contributor.authorScharf, BEen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchubot, FDen_US
dc.contributor.authorSeyler, RWen_US
dc.contributor.authorShields, PAen_US
dc.contributor.authorSong, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorStein, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, RCen_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, KVen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorYarwood, SAen_US
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Statesen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-18T18:32:28Z
dc.date.available2017-12-18T18:32:28Z
dc.date.issued2017-04en_US
dc.identifier.issn1935-7877en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/81265
dc.description.abstractMisconceptions, also known as alternate conceptions, about key concepts often hinder the ability of students to learn new knowledge. Concept inventories (CIs) are designed to assess students' understanding of key concepts, especially those prone to misconceptions. Two-tiered CIs include prompts that ask students to explain the logic behind their answer choice. Such two-tiered CIs afford an opportunity for faculty to explore the student thinking behind the common misconceptions represented by their choice of a distractor. In this study, we specifically sought to probe the misconceptions that students hold prior to beginning an introductory microbiology course (i.e., preconceptions). Faculty-learning communities at two research-intensive universities used the validated Host-Pathogen Interaction Concept Inventory (HPI-CI) to reveal student preconceptions. Our method of deep analysis involved communal review and discussion of students' explanations for their CI answer choice. This approach provided insight valuable for curriculum development. Here the process is illustrated using one question from the HPI-CI related to the important topic of antibiotic resistance. The frequencies with which students chose particular multiple-choice responses for this question were highly correlated between institutions, implying common underlying misconceptions. Examination of student explanations using our analysis approach, coupled with group discussions within and between institutions, revealed patterns in student thinking to the participating faculty. Similar application of a two-tiered concept inventory by general microbiology instructors, either individually or in groups, at other institutions will allow them to better understand student thinking related to key concepts in their curriculum.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28512513en_US
dc.titleUsing a Concept Inventory to Reveal Student Thinking Associated with Common Misconceptions about Antibiotic Resistance.en_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereed
dc.description.versionPublished online (Publication status)en_US
dc.title.serialJ Microbiol Biol Educen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v18i1.1281
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.orcidScharf, BE [0000-0001-6271-8972]en_US
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-12-14en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/Biological Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Science/COS T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciences/Fralin Affiliated Faculty


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