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dc.contributor.authorLevy, Jason M.en
dc.contributor.authorBoyer, Renee R.en
dc.contributor.authorNeilson, Andrew P.en
dc.contributor.authorO'Keefe, Sean F.en
dc.contributor.authorChu, Hyun Sik S.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Robert C.en
dc.contributor.authorDorenkott, Melanie R.en
dc.contributor.authorGoodrich, Katheryn M.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-05T15:00:27Zen
dc.date.available2018-01-05T15:00:27Zen
dc.date.issued2017-11-01en
dc.identifier.issn2048-7177en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/81545en
dc.description.abstractPeanut skin extract (PSE) and grape seed extract (GSE) are derived from waste products in the wine and peanut industries, respectively. Both have high concentrations of polyphenols, known to possess antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. PSE primarily contains “A-type” procyanidins, while GSE primarily contains “B-type” procyanidins. These differ structurally, but are both isomers of epicatechin dimers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of PSE containing A-type procyanidins and GSE containing B-type procyanidins against select foodborne pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella Typhimurium). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the two extracts on L. monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, and S. Typhimurium was determined using the pour plate method. GSE had a significantly lower MIC (p ≤ .05) than PSE for L. monocytogenes (GSE = 60.6 ppm, PSE > 68.2 ppm) and S. Typhimurium (GSE = 45.7 ppm, PSE = 60.6 ppm), but no difference in inhibition of E. coli O157:H7. Since GSE contributed to greater inhibition, GSE extract was fractionated into monomer-rich (consisting primarily of catechins, epicatechins, and epicatechin gallates) and oligomer-rich (consisting of dimers, trimers, tetramers, up to decamers) components. Growth curves of all three pathogens in the presence of full extract, monomer and oligomer fractions were compared separately. None of the extracts inhibited S. Typhimurium growth. Generally, the extract containing greater oligomer components inhibited growth of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 when compared to the control. Results indicate that an extract with type B procyanidins higher in oligomers may have greater antimicrobial properties.en
dc.format.extent1130 - 1138 (9) page(s)en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000415853500011&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectantimicrobialsen
dc.subjectfoodborne pathogensen
dc.subjectgrapeen
dc.subjectpeanuten
dc.subjectprocyanidinen
dc.subjectANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIESen
dc.subjectANTIADHESION ACTIVITYen
dc.subjectGROUND-BEEFen
dc.subjectPROANTHOCYANIDINSen
dc.subjectCOCOAen
dc.subjectPROCYANIDINSen
dc.subjectANTIBACTERIALen
dc.subjectPOLYPHENOLSen
dc.subjectREACTIVITYen
dc.subjectCHOCOLATEen
dc.titleEvaluation of peanut skin and grape seed extracts to inhibit growth of foodborne pathogensen
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en
dc.contributor.departmentFood Science and Technologyen
dc.contributor.departmentFralin Life Sciences Instituteen
dc.title.serialFOOD SCIENCE & NUTRITIONen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.503en
dc.identifier.volume5en
dc.identifier.issue6en
dc.identifier.issue6en
dc.identifier.orcidBoyer, RR [0000-0002-1412-0033]en
dc.identifier.orcidNeilson, AP [0000-0001-5497-663X]en
dc.identifier.orcidO'Keefe, SF [0000-0002-2491-7900]en
dc.identifier.orcidWilliams, RC [0000-0002-6915-1021]en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Techen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/CALS T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Food Science and Technologyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Facultyen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciencesen
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciences/Fralin Affiliated Facultyen


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
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