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dc.contributor.authorLaimbeer, F. Parker E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHolt, Sarah H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMakris, Melissaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHardigan, Michael Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuell, C. Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorVeilleux, Richard E.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-17T18:29:41Z
dc.date.available2018-01-17T18:29:41Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-14en_US
dc.identifier.issn1746-4811en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/81829
dc.description.abstractBackground: Endoreduplication, the process of DNA replication in the absence of cell division, is associated with specialized cellular function and increased cell size. Genes controlling endoreduplication in tomato fruit have been shown to affect mature fruit size. An efficient method of estimating endoreduplication is required to study its role in plant organ development. Flow cytometry is often utilized to evaluate endoreduplication, yet some tissues and species, among them the tubers of Solanum tuberosum, remain intractable to routine tissue preparation for flow cytometry. We aimed to develop a method through the use of protoplast extraction preceding flow cytometry, specifically for the assessment of endoreduplication in potato tubers. Results: We present a method for appraising endoreduplication in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber tissues. We evaluated this method and observed consistent differences between pith and cortex of tubers and between different cultivars, but no apparent relationship with whole tuber size. Furthermore, we were able to observe distinct patterns of endoreduplication in 16 of 20 wild potato relatives, with mean endoreduplication index (EI) ranging from 0.94 to 2.62 endocycles per cell. The protocol was also applied to a panel of starchy root crop species and, while only two of five yielded reliable flow histograms, the two (sweet potato and turnip) exhibited substantially lower EIs than wild and cultivated potato accessions. Conclusions: The protocol reported herein has proven effective on tubers of a variety of potato cultivars and related species, as well as storage roots of other starchy crops. This method provides an important tool for the study of potato morphology and development while revealing natural variation for endoreduplication which may have agricultural relevance.
dc.format.extent? - ? (10) page(s)en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherBiomed Central Ltden_US
dc.relation.urihttp://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000399462700002&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=930d57c9ac61a043676db62af60056c1en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectBiochemical Research Methodsen_US
dc.subjectPlant Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBiochemistry & Molecular Biologyen_US
dc.subjectSolanaceaeen_US
dc.subjectEndopolyploidizationen_US
dc.subjectSolanum tuberosumen_US
dc.subjectKaryoplasmic ratioen_US
dc.subjectCELL-DIVISIONen_US
dc.subjectELEVATED CO2en_US
dc.subjectNUCLEAR-DNAen_US
dc.subjectPLANTSen_US
dc.subjectGROWTHen_US
dc.subjectARABIDOPSISen_US
dc.subjectTISSUESen_US
dc.subjectCYCLEen_US
dc.titleProtoplast isolation prior to flow cytometry reveals clear patterns of endoreduplication in potato tubers, related species, and some starchy root cropsen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden_US
dc.description.versionPublished (Publication status)en_US
dc.title.serialPLANT METHODSen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.118/s13007-017-0177-3
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue1
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/CALS T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Agriculture & Life Sciences/Horticulture
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciences/Fralin Affiliated Faculty


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International