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dc.contributor.authorSwartwout, Brianna K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZlotnick, Marta G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSaver, Ashley E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, Caroline M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBertke, Andrea S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T13:40:04Z
dc.date.available2018-02-01T13:40:04Z
dc.date.issued2017-10-13en_US
dc.identifier.citationSwartwout, B.K.; Zlotnick, M.G.; Saver, A.E.; McKenna, C.M.; Bertke, A.S. Zika Virus Persistently and Productively Infects Primary Adult Sensory Neurons In Vitro. Pathogens 2017, 6, 49.
dc.identifier.issn2076-0817en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/81981
dc.description.abstractZika virus (ZIKV) has recently surged in human populations, causing an increase in congenital and Guillain-Barré syndromes. While sexual transmission and presence of ZIKV in urine, semen, vaginal secretions, and saliva have been established, the origin of persistent virus shedding into biological secretions is not clear. Using a primary adult murine neuronal culture model, we have determined that ZIKV persistently and productively infects sensory neurons of the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia, which innervate glands and mucosa of the face and the genitourinary tract, respectively, without apparent injury. Autonomic neurons that innervate these regions are not permissive for infection. However, productive ZIKV infection of satellite glial cells that surround and support sensory and autonomic neurons in peripheral ganglia results in their destruction. Persistent infection of sensory neurons, without affecting their viability, provides a potential reservoir for viral shedding in biological secretions for extended periods of time after infection. Furthermore, viral destruction of satellite glial cells may contribute to the development of Guillain-Barré Syndrome via an alternative mechanism to the established autoimmune response.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.relation.urihttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29027940en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
dc.subjectGuillain-Barréen_US
dc.subjectZika virusen_US
dc.subjectautonomicen_US
dc.subjectneuronsen_US
dc.subjectsatellite glial cellsen_US
dc.subjectsensoryen_US
dc.titleZika Virus Persistently and Productively Infects Primary Adult Sensory Neurons In Vitroen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereed
dc.description.versionPublished online (Publication status)en_US
dc.title.serialPathogensen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens6040049
dc.type.otherJournal Articleen_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.orcidBertke, AS [0000-0002-8941-8010]en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeText
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-10-10en_US
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/All T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Faculty of Health Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/University Research Institutes/Fralin Life Sciences/Fralin Affiliated Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/CVM T&R Faculty
pubs.organisational-group/Virginia Tech/Veterinary Medicine/Population Health Sciences


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International