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dc.contributor.authorZychowski, Diana
dc.contributor.authorDavid, Michael Z.
dc.contributor.authorRudolph, Karen M.
dc.contributor.authorBoyle-Vavra, Susan
dc.contributor.authorHennessy, Thomas W.
dc.contributor.authorAsthi, Karthik
dc.contributor.authorDaum, Robert S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-02T16:29:22Z
dc.date.available2018-03-02T16:29:22Z
dc.date.issued2012-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/82436
dc.description.abstractTo determine whether methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) USA300 commonly caused infections among Alaska Natives, we examined clinical MRSA isolates from the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, during 2000–2006. Among Anchorage-region residents, USA300 was a minor constituent among MRSA isolates in 2000–2003 (11/68, 16%); by 2006, USA300 was the exclusive genotype identifi ed (10/10).en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCenters for Disease Control and Preventionen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.titleMRSA USA300 at Alaska native medical center, Anchorage, Alaska, USA, 2000-2006en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.title.serialEmerging Infectious Diseaseen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3201/eid1801.110746
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US


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