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dc.contributor.authorHamill, Bridgeten_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-01T08:00:34Z
dc.date.available2018-05-01T08:00:34Z
dc.date.issued2018-04-30
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:14606en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/82956
dc.description.abstractThis study considered the school effects of college going behavior for rural students. Of interest were the effects of location and college-going culture within a given school. The research questions asked, included: 1. What are the effects of rural school location and college-going culture on public high school graduation? 2. What are the effects of rural school location and college-going culture on college enrollment? 3. For the public high school graduates who enrolled in college, what are the effects of rural school location and college-going culture on the control structure of the college program enrolled? 4. For the public high school graduates who enrolled in college, what are the effects of rural school location and college-going culture on type of college program enrolled (two-year vs. four-year)? 5. For the public high school graduates who enrolled in college, what are the effects of rural school location and college-going culture on full-time vs. part-time enrollment? The study used data from the HSLS:09 survey. The data was analyzed using Hierarchical Generalized Linear Modeling. This study found that the odds of attending college decreased 18.7% for rural students. There was also a 4.8% decrease in the odds of college enrollment by students from majority White high schools. School's with high mean GPA's were more likely to have students graduate from high school, enroll in college, and attend 4-year institutions. High rates of school problems negatively affected students and demonstrated decreased odds of high school graduation and college enrollment. The role of counselors had demonstrated effects on students. Schools with counseling offices that focused a high number of hours on college counseling increase the odds their students graduate would from high school and attend a 4-year institution. Students attending high schools with a college counselor dedicated to college applications were 4.30 times more likely to attend a not-for-profit institution than a for-profit institution.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectRuralen_US
dc.subjectCollege-going behavioren_US
dc.subjectSchool effectsen_US
dc.subjectCollege enrollmenten_US
dc.titleCollege-Going Behaviors: Are there School Effects for the Rural Student?en_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHigher Educationen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairJanosik, Steven M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiyazaki, Yasuoen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Kenneth Samuelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSerna, Gabriel Ramonen_US


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