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dc.contributor.authorFelder, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorCastillo, Camila
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-04T15:40:43Z
dc.date.available2018-05-04T15:40:43Z
dc.date.issued2011-01-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/82980
dc.description.abstractIn an increasingly diverse and global society, it is imperative that doctoral education be pursued and completed by more diverse students. Currently, there is a significant disparity in doctoral degree completion, which is evident by the fact that in 2008 Blacks and Latinos represented less than 4,000 of the total number of 48,802 doctoral degree recipients (Hoffer, Hess, Welch, and Williams 2008). This paper argues the need to improve doctoral student persistence, particularly for Black and Latino students, considering the importance of hiring diverse faculty and staff as a critical issue now than ever before.
dc.description.sponsorshipAcademic Leadership Journal
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherAcademic Leadership Journal
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
dc.subjectDoctoral degree
dc.subjectBlack students
dc.subjectLatin American students
dc.subjectBlack and Latino faculty representation
dc.subjectfaculty
dc.titleA Commentary About the Black and Latino Doctoral Experience in the United States
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.accessed2018-02-16
dc.identifier.volumeVolume 9: Issue 1, Article 3
dc.type.dcmitypeText
dc.identifier.sourceurlhttps://scholars.fhsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1583&context=alj


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