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dc.contributor.authorWhitley, Daniel Edwarden_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-20T08:02:35Z
dc.date.available2018-06-20T08:02:35Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-19en_US
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:15744en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/83575
dc.description.abstractThis study analyzes the reporting and editorializing in several major American newspapers during the height of the Citizen Genêt Affair in July and August, 1793. A hybrid form of sociological moral panic theory, focused predominantly on the "iteration" of moral panics and the language used to communicate them, is used to understand the dynamics of the information landscape of 1793. Specific attention is paid to the effects of time and space, personal and political bias, and incendiary historical rhetoric on reporting of and reactions to Genêt's actions. In doing so, this study highlights possible flaws or blind spots in both moral panic theory and historiography, and brings new understanding to the media environment in which America's political traditions gestated. Brief connections are drawn between this historical information landscape and series of events and contemporary concerns with regards to social media and incendiary political rhetoric.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectAmericaen_US
dc.subjectNewspapersen_US
dc.subjectPolitical Rhetoricen_US
dc.subjectMoral Panicen_US
dc.subjectInformation Networksen_US
dc.titleMoral Panic and Political Rhetoric in the Early American Republicen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEnglishen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRadcliffe, David Hillen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Ashleyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGraham, Peter W.en_US


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