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dc.contributor.authorBurns, Dereken_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-17T20:29:54Z
dc.date.available2018-07-17T20:29:54Z
dc.date.issued2018en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/84103
dc.description.abstractStress is a concept that can be studied using a variety of theoretical approaches, with a focus on the individual’s perceptions, the external stressor, or the physiological reactions of stress responding. However these approaches are often used independently, when they can be used complementarily to understand the nuanced relationship between the individual and the situation when appraising stressors as challenges or threats. The current study examined the relationship between individual differences in perceptions, situational strength (both as a categorical and a continuous predictor), and physiological reactions in a leadership task. Situational strength and leadership self-efficacy were found to interact, such that those high is LSE reported more appraisals of challenge as situational strength increased.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectleadershipen_US
dc.subjectstressen_US
dc.subjectphysiological reactivityen_US
dc.subjectsituational strengthen_US
dc.titleLeader Development or Leader Distress? Examining the Interactive Effects of Leadership Self-Efficacy and Situational Strength on Perceptions of Stress, Performance, and Physiological Responsesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPsychologyen_US
dc.description.degreeMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial/Organizational Psychologyen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairFoti, Roseanne J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHauenstein, Neil M.A., Bruce H. Friedmanen_US
dc.description.abstractgeneralStress is a widely known concept that has been studied in various ways (individual perceptions, situational characteristics, physiology, etc.). However these approaches are often used independently, when they can be used together to more fully understand the process of how individuals appraise stressors. The current study examined the relationship between the previously mentioned approaches within a leadership task. Situational strength and leadership self-efficacy (LSE), or one’s perceived capabilities to perform leadership duties, were found to interact, such that those high is LSE reported more appraisals of challenge as situational strength increased.en_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)
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