Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHinton, Joseph W.en
dc.contributor.authorProctor, Christineen
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Marcella J.en
dc.contributor.authorvan Manen, Frank T.en
dc.contributor.authorVaughan, Michael R.en
dc.contributor.authorChamberlain, Michael J.en
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-01T17:31:52Zen
dc.date.available2018-08-01T17:31:52Zen
dc.date.issued2016-12-21en
dc.identifier.othere0167603en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/84462en
dc.description.abstractRecovery of large carnivores remains a challenge because complex spatial dynamics that facilitate population persistence are poorly understood. In particular, recovery of the critically endangered red wolf (Canis rufus) has been challenging because of its vulnerability to extinction via human-caused mortality and hybridization with coyotes (Canis latrans). Therefore, understanding red wolf space use and habitat selection is important to assist recovery because key aspects of wolf ecology such as interspecific competition, foraging, and habitat selection are well-known to influence population dynamics and persistence. During 2009–2011, we used global positioning system (GPS) radio-telemetry to quantify space use and 3rd-order habitat selection for resident and transient red wolves on the Albemarle Peninsula of eastern North Carolina. The Albemarle Peninsula was a predominantly agricultural landscape in which red wolves maintained spatially stable home ranges that varied between 25 km2 and 190 km2. Conversely, transient red wolves did not maintain home ranges and traversed areas between 122 km2 and 681 km2. Space use by transient red wolves was not spatially stable and exhibited shifting patterns until residency was achieved by individual wolves. Habitat selection was similar between resident and transient red wolves in which agricultural habitats were selected over forested habitats. However, transients showed stronger selection for edges and roads than resident red wolves. Behaviors of transient wolves are rarely reported in studies of space use and habitat selection because of technological limitations to observed extensive space use and because they do not contribute reproductively to populations. Transients in our study comprised displaced red wolves and younger dispersers that competed for limited space and mating opportunities. Therefore, our results suggest that transiency is likely an important life-history strategy for red wolves that facilitates metapopulation dynamics through short- and long-distance movements and eventual replacement of breeding residents lost to mortality.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherPLOSen
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleSpace Use and Habitat Selection by Resident and Transient Red Wolves (Canis rufus)en
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden
dc.description.versionPeer Revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentFish and Wildlife Conservationen
dc.title.serialPLoS Oneen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0167603en
dc.identifier.volume11en
dc.identifier.issue12en
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten
dc.identifier.pmid28002495en
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International