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dc.contributor.authorBlevins, Stephanie Lynnen
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-13T08:00:16Zen
dc.date.available2018-10-13T08:00:16Zen
dc.date.issued2018-10-12en
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:16889en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/85361en
dc.description.abstractHokie BugFest is an annual free event designed by the Entomology Department at Virginia Tech to translate the importance of entomology to the public. The event has grown from 2,000 attendees in 2011 to over 8,000 attendees in 2017. Entomology faculty, staff, graduate students and alumni partner with Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia 4-H, and other entities to provide an educational experience to the public. The goal of this outreach event is to showcase entomological research, increase public awareness, elevate the appreciation of entomology, develop better public perceptions of insects and other arthropods, and educate participants about pesticide safety and pest management practices. Although many institutions host entomology outreach events like Hokie BugFest (Frazier, 2002; Hamm and Rayor, 2007; Hvenegaard et al., 2013), little research has been conducted to compare the impact of these activities. Whether these events impact public attitudes toward insects and other arthropods is also lacking (Pitt and Shockley, 2014). Several studies have been conducted in other states to investigate public attitudes toward arthropods and pesticides (Baldwin et al., 2008; Byrne et al., 1984; Frankie and Levenson, 1978; Hahn and Ascerno, 1991; Potter and Bessin, 1998); however, research is missing in Virginia. In order to contribute to this literature, three surveys were developed. One survey focused on investigating entomology outreach events similar to Hokie BugFest. Results revealed that event structure, attendance, funding sources, and popular exhibits impact the hosting institution and the surrounding communities. The other two surveys focused on gauging the impacts Hokie BugFest has on youth and adult attendees. Results indicated the event has a positive impact on attendee perceptions of insects, other arthropods, and pesticides.en
dc.format.mediumETDen
dc.publisherVirginia Techen
dc.rightsIn Copyrighten
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en
dc.subjectHokie BugFesten
dc.subjectinsect festivalsen
dc.subjectentomologyen
dc.subjectuniversity outreachen
dc.subjectpublic viewsen
dc.subjectarthropodsen
dc.subjectpesticidesen
dc.titleComparing University Entomology Outreach Events While Examining Public Views of Arthropods and Pesticidesen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentEntomologyen
dc.description.degreeMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science in Life Sciencesen
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen
dc.contributor.committeechairWeaver, Michael Johnen
dc.contributor.committeememberPrice, Tonya T.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMarek, Paul E.en
dc.description.abstractgeneralEach year, the Department of Entomology at Virginia Tech hosts Hokie BugFest, a free event designed to emphasize the importance of entomology to the public. The event began in 2011 and has grown from 2,000 attendees to over 8,000 attendees in 2017. Hokie BugFest is collaboratively organized by Entomology faculty, staff, graduate students and alumni who partner with Virginia Cooperative Extension, Virginia 4-H, and other entities to provide an educational experience to the public. The goal of this outreach event is to showcase entomological research, increase public awareness and appreciation of entomology, and educate attendees about pesticide safety and pest management practices. Although many institutions host entomology outreach events like Hokie BugFest, little is known of the impact of these activities and how they influence public attitudes toward entomology. Information is available for other states concerning public attitudes toward arthropods and pesticides, however is lacking in Virginia. In order to contribute to this body of work, this study focused on investigating entomology outreach events similar to Hokie BugFest. Results revealed information on event structure, attendance, funding sources, popular exhibits, and impacts on the hosting institution and surrounding communities. This study also focused on gauging the impacts of Hokie BugFest on youth and adult attendees. Results indicated the event has a positive impact on attendee perceptions of insects, other arthropods, and pesticides.en


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