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dc.contributor.authorCasey, Maxine Austinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-24T06:00:53Z
dc.date.available2018-10-24T06:00:53Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-01
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:10819en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/85469
dc.description.abstractFor more than three decades, research has shown that the special education referral, identification, and placement processes can be discriminatory (Artiles, Rueda, Salazar, and Higareda, 2005). Proportionately, there are more minority students of low socio-economic status than are White students in special education categories that are the high incidence special education categories. Students with high-incidence disabilities make up 80% of all students with disabilities. High-Incidence disabilities share these characteristics, (1) often hard to distinguish from students without disabilities, especially in non-school settings, (2) often display a combination of academic, and (3) behavioral and social problems (Friend and Bursuck, 2012). Special Education licensure and endorsement varies from state to state, as does the terminology used in describing the knowledge that is required and the students to whom it applies. In most states students identified for special education services for the categories of Intellectual Disability (ID), Specific Learning Disability (SLD) and students with Emotional Disturbance (ED) are identified as high- incidence disabilities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the status of relative representation of male and female, minority, and low socioeconomic students with disabilities served in special education programs across 132 public school divisions within eight Superintendent']s regions in the 2013-14 school year, as published by the Virginia Department of Education. Data from the Virginia Department Education (VDOE) were analyzed to present an analysis of three categories of the special education populations (ID, SLD and ED), racial, (Black and Hispanic) and socio-economic status. Findings indicated that fewer than 50% of the school divisions in the Commonwealth of Virginia showed disproportionality, however when examined by Superintendent's regions there were some geographical areas that showed some concentrations of disproportionality.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectoverrepresentationen_US
dc.subjectspecial educationen_US
dc.subjectminoritiesen_US
dc.subjectdisproportionateen_US
dc.subjectdisproportionalityen_US
dc.subjectproportionalityen_US
dc.subjectrisk-ratioen_US
dc.subjectsocio-economicsen_US
dc.subjectand povertyen_US
dc.titleProportional Representation of Students with Disabilities Based on Race, Gender, and Socio-Economic Status in Virginiaen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen_US
dc.description.degreeEd. D.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadership and Policy Studiesen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairEarthman, Glen I.en_US
dc.contributor.committeechairCash, Carol S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTwiford, Travis W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBibb, Wanda Janeen_US


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