Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPan, Dengen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Liqingen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-14T14:44:43Z
dc.date.available2018-11-14T14:44:43Z
dc.date.issued2009-10-23en_US
dc.identifier.othere7342en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/85841
dc.description.abstractThe notion that gene duplications generating new genes and functions is commonly accepted in evolutionary biology. However, this assumption is more speculative from theory rather than well proven in genome-wide studies. Here, we generated an atlas of the rate of copy number changes (CNCs) in all the gene families of ten animal genomes. We grouped the gene families with similar CNC dynamics into rate pattern groups (RPGs) and annotated their function using a novel bottom-up approach. By comparing CNC rate patterns, we showed that most of the species-specific CNC rates groups are formed by gene duplication rather than gene loss, and most of the changes in rates of CNCs may be the result of adaptive evolution. We also found that the functions of many RPGs match their biological significance well. Our work confirmed the role of gene duplication in generating novel phenotypes, and the results can serve as a guide for researchers to connect the phenotypic features to certain gene duplications.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherPLOSen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 Internationalen_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0en_US
dc.titleAn Atlas of the Speed of Copy Number Changes in Animal Gene Families and Its Implicationsen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereeden_US
dc.description.versionPeer Revieweden_US
dc.title.serialPLOS ONEen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0007342en_US
dc.identifier.volume4en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.type.dcmitypeTexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid19851465en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
License: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International