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dc.contributor.authorKhreiche, Marioen_US
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-01T09:00:26Z
dc.date.available2018-12-01T09:00:26Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-30
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:17711en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/86205
dc.description.abstractThe present project provides a survey of contemporary work relations in the context of the so-called gig economy (also known as the sharing, collaborative, platform, and on-demand economy). Against the background of recent concerns over automation replacing work at a large scale, the project argues instead that the displacement of work warrants more critical attention. The project examines how the gig economy presents their services as automating technologies while downplaying the ways that workers' employment, not to mention lives, are made increasingly precarious by these alleged improvements. Specifically, the project surveys three gig-economies, the ride-hailing service Uber, the home-sharing service Airbnb, and the online labor marketplace Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT). Methodologically, the project employs an interdisciplinary approach, integrating insights from political economy, critical theory, discourse analysis, and ethnographic research. A qualitative assessment of the respective work environments shifts a relatively apolitical discourse on the future of work not only toward a more pronounced critique of the gig economy, but also toward a renewed discussion on the kinds of jobs that earn the labels of freelance and entrepreneurship. Professionals and scholars concerned with the future of work stand to benefit from the findings of the research, particularly as it challenges some commonplace assumptions in the discourse of what has been termed postcapitalism.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectGig Economyen_US
dc.subjectSharing Economyen_US
dc.subjectPlatform Economyen_US
dc.subjectOn-Demand Economyen_US
dc.subjectCollaborative Economyen_US
dc.subjectThe Future of Worken_US
dc.subjectAutomationen_US
dc.subjectInterfaceen_US
dc.subjectMilieuen_US
dc.subjectMotilityen_US
dc.subjectPrecarityen_US
dc.subjectLiquidationen_US
dc.subjectPotentialityen_US
dc.subjectInequalityen_US
dc.titleMilieus in the Gig Economyen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentPolitical Scienceen_US
dc.description.degreePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thoughten_US
dc.contributor.committeechairLuke, Timothy W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeechairKalyan, Rohanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDebrix, Francoisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBreslau, Danielen_US


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