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dc.contributor.authorSchwarzenbach, Esther M.
dc.contributor.authorCaddick, Mark J.
dc.contributor.authorPetroff, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorGill, Benjamin C.
dc.contributor.authorCooperdock, Emily H. G.
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Jaime D.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-07T20:25:04Z
dc.date.available2018-12-07T20:25:04Z
dc.date.issued2018-10-19
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.other15517
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/86269
dc.description.abstractSubduction zones impose an important control on the geochemical cycling between the surficial and internal reservoirs of the Earth. Sulphur and carbon are transferred into Earth's mantle by subduction of pelagic sediments and altered oceanic lithosphere. Release of oxidizing sulphate- and carbonate-bearing fluids modifies the redox state of the mantle and the chemical budget of subduction zones. Yet, the mechanisms of sulphur and carbon cycling within subduction zones are still unclear, in part because data are typically derived from arc volcanoes where fluid compositions are modified during transport through the mantle wedge. We determined the bulk rock elemental, and sulphur and carbon isotope compositions of exhumed ultramafic and metabasic rocks from Syros, Greece. Comparison of isotopic data with major and trace element compositions indicates seawater alteration and chemical exchange with sediment-derived fluids within the subduction zone channel. We show that small bodies of detached slab material are subject to metasomatic processes during exhumation, in contrast to large sequences of obducted ophiolitic sections that retain their seafloor alteration signatures. In particular, fluids circulating along the plate interface can cause sulphur mobilization during several stages of exhumation within high-pressure rocks. This takes place more pervasively in serpentinites compared to mafic rocks.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNSF-EAR [1324566]; NSF EAR [1250470]; German Research Foundation; Open Access Publication Fund of Freie Universitat Berlin
dc.format.extent11 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Nature
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectmicrobial sulfate reduction
dc.subjecthosted hydrothermal systems
dc.subjectfluid-rock interaction
dc.subjectoceanic-crust
dc.subjectgarnet growth
dc.subjectwestern alps
dc.subjectsyros greece
dc.subjectserpentinites
dc.subjectisotope
dc.subjectcyclades
dc.titleSulphur and carbon cycling in the subduction zone melangeen_US
dc.typeArticle - Refereed
dc.description.notesThis project was supported by NSF-EAR grant 1324566 to E.M.S. and B.C.G., and NSF EAR award 1250470 to M.J.C. We thank E.F. Baxter, J.C. Schumacher, J.S. Gorce, H.L. Brooks, E. Ramos, and J.A. Kendall for participation in field work and sample collection, and for subsequent discussions. We acknowledge support by the German Research Foundation and the Open Access Publication Fund of the Freie Universitat Berlin.
dc.title.serialScientific Reports
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-33610-9
dc.identifier.volume8
dc.type.dcmitypeText
dc.identifier.pmid30341323


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