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dc.contributor.authorLouk, Andrew Kyleen_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-05T09:00:45Z
dc.date.available2019-02-05T09:00:45Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-04
dc.identifier.othervt_gsexam:18627en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10919/87434
dc.description.abstractDuring the past decade, carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) has gained considerable recognition as a viable option to mitigate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This process involves capturing CO2 at emission sources such as power plants, refineries, and processing plants, and safely and permanently storing it in underground geologic formations. Many CO2 injection tests have been successfully conducted to assess the storage potential of CO2 in saline formations, oil and natural gas reservoirs, organic-rich shales, and unmineable coal reservoirs. Coal seams are an attractive reservoir for CO2 storage due to coal's large capacity to store gas within its microporous structure, as well as its ability to preferentially adsorb CO2 over naturally occurring methane resulting in enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery. A small-scale CO2 injection test was conducted in Southwest Virginia to assess the storage and ECBM recovery potential of CO2 in a coalbed methane reservoir. The goal of this test was to inject up to 20,000 tons of CO2 into a stacked coal reservoir of approximately 15-20 coal seams. Phase I of the injection test was conducted from July 2, 2015 to April 15, 2016 when a total of 10,601 tons of CO2 were injected. Phase II of the injection was conducted from December 14, 2016 to January 30, 2017 when an additional 2,662 tons of CO2 were injected, for a total of 13,263 total tons of CO2 injected. A customized monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) plan was created to monitor CO2 injection activities, including surface, near-surface, and subsurface technologies. As part of this MVA plan, chemical tracers were used as a tool to help track CO2 plume migration within the reservoir and determine interwell connectivity. The work presented in this dissertation will discuss the development and implementation of chemical tracers as a monitoring tool, detail wellbore-scale tests performed to characterize CO2 breakthrough and interwell connectivity, and present results from both phases of the CO2 injection test.en_US
dc.format.mediumETDen_US
dc.publisherVirginia Techen_US
dc.rightsThis item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. Some uses of this item may be deemed fair and permitted by law even without permission from the rights holder(s), or the rights holder(s) may have licensed the work for use under certain conditions. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights holder(s).en_US
dc.subjectCO2 sequestrationen_US
dc.subjectcoalen_US
dc.subjectenhanced coalbed methaneen_US
dc.subjecttracersen_US
dc.titleMonitoring CO2 Plume Migration for a Carbon Storage-Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery Test in Central Appalachiaen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMining Engineeringen_US
dc.description.degreePHDen_US
thesis.degree.namePHDen_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.grantorVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State Universityen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining Engineeringen_US
dc.contributor.committeechairRipepi, Nino Sen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKarmis, Michael Een_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGilliland, Ellenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLuxbacher, Kramer Davisen_US
dc.description.abstractgeneralDuring the past decade, carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) has gained considerable recognition as a viable option to mitigate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This process involves capturing CO2 at emission sources such as power plants, refineries, and processing plants, and safely and permanently storing it in underground geologic formations. Many CO2 injection tests have been successfully conducted to assess the storage potential of CO2 in saline formations, oil and natural gas reservoirs, organic-rich shales, and unmineable coal reservoirs. Coal seams are an attractive reservoir for CO2 storage due to coal’s large capacity to store gas within its microporous structure, as well as its ability to preferentially adsorb CO2 over naturally occurring methane resulting in enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery. A small-scale CO2 injection test was conducted in Southwest Virginia to assess the storage and ECBM recovery potential of CO2 in a coalbed methane reservoir. The goal of this test was to inject up to 20,000 tons of CO2 into a stacked coal reservoir of approximately 15-20 coal seams. Phase I of the injection test was conducted from July 2, 2015 to April 15, 2016 when a total of 10,601 tons of CO2 were injected. Phase II of the injection was conducted from December 14, 2016 to January 30, 2017 when an additional 2,662 tons of CO2 were injected, for a total of 13,263 total tons of CO2 injected. A customized monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) plan was created to monitor CO2 injection activities, including surface, near-surface, and subsurface technologies. As part of this MVA plan, chemical tracers were used as a tool to help track CO2 plume migration within the reservoir and determine interwell connectivity. The work presented in this dissertation will discuss the development and implementation of chemical tracers as a monitoring tool, detail wellbore-scale tests performed to characterize CO2 breakthrough and interwell connectivity, and present results from both phases of the CO2 injection test.en


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